A+ A A-

Conservation fund is where 100% of land use change tax belongs

To The Daily Sun,

I read in The Sun that the Sanbornton Conservation Committee has proposed putting 100 percent of the land use change tax into their land conservation fund. Gilford has been doing that for years, now, and it is because our voters had the foresight to agree to a similar article that we have been able to protect approximately 1,000 acres of our key natural resources while assuring our goals to keep our rural character.

Pretty obvious that the price of land is expensive and will only escalate in the future, so voting in favor of this proposal will give much needed funds to help meet Sanbornton's desire to also remain a rural community. The money comes from large parcels that landowners have enjoyed significant tax breaks for years because they have been held under current use. When land is pulled out of current use for development, the tax is 10 percent of the value. Towns have recognized that it only makes sense that with major losses of large tracts of land to development, it is imperative to put that small amount of tax money into their land conservation fund to try to protect critical natural resources without asking for money from taxpayers. The other plus for for putting 100 percent of the money into the land conservation fund is that it can be used as required matching funds for important land conservation grants, thereby doubling the purchasing power.

There aren't many avenues where we can help provide a lasting and important benefit to this world, but land conservation is certainly right at the top.

To Sanbornton voters, please support your local Conservation Commission's efforts to receive 100 percent of the land use change tax so they will have the much needed funds to protect your most critical natural resources and help maintain that beautiful rural character that make Sanbornton such a beautiful scenic community.

Everett McLaughlin
Gilford

Last Updated on Monday, 12 May 2014 08:24

Hits: 166

Duncan will protect every N.H. child'sright to quality education

To The Daily Sun,

It was very disheartening to read another example of Senate Republican Leader Jeb Bradley using half-truths and fear-mongering to pander to the extreme right wing of his party. In order to garner votes in November he has cynically criticized Bill Duncan's nomination to the New Hampshire Board of Education.

Bradley is quoted in a Concord Monitor article Tuesday, May 6, saying, "Duncan is the lead plaintiff in a lawsuit challenging the business tax credit that gives scholarships to students who attend private and religious schools, and he opposes charter schools." What Bradley fails to include in his limited information statement is that there is a good chance the NH Superior Court will find the business tax credit (passed by the Republican controlled Senate and House in 2012) unconstitutional just like the Medicaid Enhancement Tax was in April 2014.

Now some of those same Republican legislators are dancing as fast as they can to figure out how to compensate for the multimillion-dollar hole they created with their votes, Bradley being one of them. Who knows what further financial damage will be done to the state budget if the thinly disguised business tax credit (a voucher system in reality) is also found to be unconstitutional.

I am glad the Executive Council saw fit to approve Gov. Hassan's nomination of Bill Duncan. New Hampshire students, families and taxpayers need a knowledgeable advocate who will protect every child's right to a quality, standards-based education, taught by caring and qualified professionals.

Kay M. Anderson
Laconia

Last Updated on Monday, 12 May 2014 08:21

Hits: 95

School Board tried to limit proper amount of rebuke that was due

To The Daily Sun,

After attending the most recent meeting of the Gilford School Board, I have three basic observations and a few other random thoughts.

1. What we have "hee..AH"..... is ah Failure ta, communicate!''

2. I would suggest that the School Board completely reject the book "Nineteen Minutes" from being included in any future curricula for any grade level in the Gilford public schools. Instead they should consider Mr Lambert's suggestion as to using subjects of valid English literature and substitute Keat's "Ode on Melancholy" and Coleridge's "Kubla Khan" into the curriculum in lieu of such distasteful to the community standards un-vetted, "contemporary" American/English literature. In addition the School Board might take note of Coleridge's "Epigram," and perhaps glean something from that.

3. I too, as Doug Lambert, have some favorite Bible passages. So the community, righteous in our indignation, might pause to read some of 1 Corinthians 7:7. The School Board members might want to contemplate Mr. Baer's situation in relation to 1 Timothy 5:8. We do wish, as did St, Paul, that the community have some patience and grant a bit of forbearance to those who are not fully committed to common decency, and may be less strong in the faith than ourselves, but that not withstanding. are well meaning.

Certainly the School Board must have been well meaning when fully apprised that they had a budding "soap opera" on their hands, they sought to handle such by suppressing the inevitable displays of indignation and outrage. Reactions by the School Board in admitting to some oversights certainly support the sense of outrage that some parents displayed at the meeting. School Board Chair Sue Allen is recently quoted as having used the term "ridiculous" to describe this statewide airing of a public "soap opera" turned into a public political scandal.

I have attended several Gilford School Board meetings over the years. I can remember one where the discussion of a Belmont football merger went on so long I deemed it not an appropriate time for the sake of not further lengthening the meeting to speak at that meeting to a different agenda item. So it was ridiculous to attempt to stifle and suppress the public comment at this meeting for the sole purpose of not wanting to take the full heat of the outraged on this curriculum issue.

While I'm widely regarded as a RINO and would have seen this text as possibly appropriate for juniors after the Christmas break or seniors in their last high school year, I agree it was wrong to make it part of the curriculum for high school freshmen. I agree with those who believe this book could be properly made available in the high school library and our public library.

I thank Mr. Wernig for his politically motivated remarks in support of his political allies of the government education industry and their empathizers. If not for his remarks suggesting book banning outside of the public school curriculum was at issue, which clearly rubbed salt into the wounds of Mr. Baer, Mr. Baer may not have gotten himself so further incensed and then arrested in front of the TV cameras of WMUR. Often times it is more valid to: "Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice."

In their attempt to save themselves some embarrassment, to limit the amount of proper rebuke they were due, and to limit the timeframe of the meeting for their own convenience, the Gilford School Board helped create and escalate this "ridiculous" situation to an airing of our dirty laundry "soap opera" across the entire state. There actually was film at 11 and on the television news again the next day. Many of us hope these "ridiculous" charges are dropped against Mr. Baer. Prosecuting him will just be more of the same in escalating the sense of outrage so many of the voters of Gilford are feeling on these issues.

Timothy Sullivan
Gilford

Last Updated on Monday, 12 May 2014 08:18

Hits: 71

Is there really need for computer class at elementary school?

To The Daily Sun,

In this world where childhood obesity is on the rise, is cutting back on physical education and health education opportunities a good decision?

At Woodland Heights School, all the specialists' positions are being cut to four-fifths time employment. This is being done as a way to compensate for budgetary constraints. "They" say that this cutback will not have an impact of the specials opportunities that children receive, or will it?

My first concern I will raise is the fact that Pleasant Street School and Elm Street School students have physical education class two times per week while Woodland Heights School has it only once. In this day when the district is trying to get all of the elementary schools to be cohesive and run more uniformly, why this major discrepancy between schools? Do parents at WHS know that their child has PE only once a week while the other elementary schools have it twice? If they did, would this concern them? I can tell you that it concerns this parent.

My second concern is that the "powers-that-be" are just looking at a paper schedule and seeing a lot of open holes in the specialist schedules. They are not seeing the endless enrichment opportunities that the specialists are doing above and beyond the paper schedule. If the PE teacher's time gets cut, gone are the health education classes that are happening in conjunction with the UNH Cooperative Extension and the extra PE classes that some of the classes are receiving.

I love that my child is able to get exposure to music, art and library. The question I raise: Is there really a need for computer class at the elementary level? I had been thinking recently that I would love to see the district get rid of computer class, an ungraded class lasting 40 minutes per week, and replace it with a health class. Research has shown the positive impact that a consistent health curriculum can have at the elementary level. Obviously, with the cut-backs, this dream will not come to fruition. Is the Laconia School District blinded by the technology bug, this bug that is infecting our children, sucking the life out of them... literally. This heavy emphasis on technology is causing our children to be less physically active, less socially aware, less able to sit and hold their attention and reinforces the need for instant gratification.

In this day and age, computers are a way of life, I understand that they are here to stay. Think of it this way if you will. Computers are a tool that we use, similar to using a pencil. Do we have a specific class dedicated to using a pencil? No. Learning to use a pencil is integrated in daily classroom activities. Students' exposure to computers and technology can be handled at the main classroom level, as it is now, with classroom Netbooks and iPads allowing them to get a basic introduction. They will see and witness how technology can be used in life as their teachers use iPads, laptops, document cameras and smart boards. More in-depth computer education should then be started when they get to middle school and continuing in high school. It is no longer the 1990s and 2200s when the advancements in technology surpassed our knowledge and we needed to catch up. We are living it and learning it as part of everyday life.

Elementary school children do not need more encouragement to be on electronics, taking them further away from being physically and emotionally active and healthy. Please consider keeping physical education as a full-time position with the hope that we can even expand this and get the children moving more and more interested in health. I have offered up, in my mind, a viable option. Will Laconia School District consider it? I hope they do.

Gail Jenson

Laconia

Last Updated on Monday, 12 May 2014 08:13

Hits: 94

Theme of this book is not sex; it's about bullying leading to shooting

To The Daily Sun,

I am a ninth-grade student at Gilford High School, who was assigned to read "Nineteen Minutes," by Jodi Picoult in my honors English class. As soon as I began reading the book, I was intrigued and could not put it down. I completed the book on Tuesday, and I have to say, it has impacted my life greatly.

I feel that a lot of schools in today's society try to pretend that school shootings do not happen, no one is bullied, and rape does not happen. In the real world, this is not reality. While this book may have depicted the extreme side of all three of these topics, I think that it is extremely important that high school students are taught about these issues in depth.

If I were a parent, flipping through my child's book and opened up to the page that describes sexual activity, I would most likely be shocked as well, especially seeing how no parents were notified beforehand. The page is more graphic than what you would normally find, but it does help to explain the story. I believe that the letters not being sent home before the assignment was indeed an accident, because permission slips were sent home before our class watched the movie, "Mississippi Burning."

However, the theme of this book is not about sex. It is about a school shooting that was caused by bullying. This one page that describes Josie and Matt's sexual activity gives readers insight into their relationship and gives a better understanding of their characters. It also explains parts of the main incident of "Nineteen Minutes," and ultimately, what happens to Matt and why. Some people may argue that this scene was too graphic and unnecessary, but the fact that that Josie was raped by Matt, is actually immensely important to the plot.

Overall, I do believe that reading this book actually has changed me for the better, and I do see people differently now. Teenagers in this day and age do not realize the impact that bullying has on the victim. I am sure that almost every person in a public school has been a bully, but also a victim, and this book makes readers think about their actions. I know I have. I don't believe that "Nineteen Minutes" is "garbage." I think that my teacher's choice of literature is very relevant to many lives of teenagers today.

Madelyn Griffeth

Gilmanton

Last Updated on Monday, 12 May 2014 08:04

Hits: 95

 
The Laconia Daily Sun - All Rights Reserved
Privacy Policy
Powered by BENN a division of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Login or Register

LOG IN