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The curtain rises to unbridled anarchy, martial law and civil war

To The Daily Sun,

Can you hear it emanating from America's lungs? You know the administration leads to criticism, intimidation, belittlement, and silencing of law and order as Sharpton, white force spokesman, calls attention to a predeclared society that "this war ain't over yet!"

You know the curtain rises to unbridled anarchy. Next will come martial law — confiscation of arms, leading to civil war. Next congress will be sent home and they can't function in this chaos and their safety is at stake. Note: ISIS. An executive order will circumvent the 22nd Amendment and no election is legal under martial law. Habeas corpus will be cancelled and no rail has sufficient capacity to hold an ever increasing population of "Subversives". Maybe Joe Arpio can expand his desert campus with more tents. Or perhaps a more expedient measure invoked.

Ward H. Flanders

Laconia

Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 December 2014 07:16

Hits: 212

When trying to create a panic at least get your history right

To The Daily Sun,

On Thursday (letter writer) Michael (last name omitted to save embarrassment) tells us World War I started in 1905 between Russia and Japan over oil. Strange, when I was in school I was taught that the Russian/Japanese war of 1905 was over Port Arthur, a year-round ice free harbor into the Pacific the Russians had long wanted. The Japanese Navy crushed the Russians and Teddy Roosevelt brokered the peace treaty in Portsmouth, N.H., winning the Nobel Peace Prize. But hey, what do I know?

Then in 1912 another terrible war started in Europe. No, I don't think so. There was no war in Europe until 1914, or so the history books read. I think that was called World War I, yea pretty sure it was a world war. Sure was a bad bit of stuff, (wonder if Michael thinks that was about oil, too)?

Fast forward to U.S. invasion of Iraq twice. Twice? As I recall there was the Gulf War where two dozen countries kicked the Iraq army out of Kuwait after Iraq had invaded that country. It was a decade later that we invaded Iraq, because of oil Michael says. Really Mike, then how come we didn't take their darn oil?

"Beware the Bear," oil prices are falling or is it the sky? Russia today is not the powerful USSR we faced down in the second half of the 20th century, but Michael is running to hide under his bed apparently. I remember back in the 1950s chanting "better red then dead" in fear of the USSR. Michael reminds me of them.

Just a little advice Mike, when trying to create a panic at least get your history right.
Steve Earle
Hill

Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 December 2014 07:11

Hits: 116

Where can I sign up for the right-wing parrot daily newsletter?

To The Daily Sun,

I have to wonder when I read the right wing letters, where do they get their daily updates from?

A letter written Dec. 11 by Anne Rogers explained very nicely the benefits provided by Obamacare. All information past and present from the parrots have been doom and gloom. Ms. Rogers talks about the 10 million who can now afford health care. A article written today in the Union Leader on Page 3 reads Medicare payments will be cut to three New Hampshire hospitals. The three to lose are Catholic Medical Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock, and Elliot Hospital. A short quote: "The Patient Protection ACA (Obamacare) includes a host of incentives for reducing what is known in the health care industry as hospital acquired conditions." Perhaps this will be discussed by the parrots.

Some one needs to inform Mr. Earle that the Benghazi affair is closed with no fault found with actions taken by White House. The IRS affair ended today with the same outcome. So much for phony scandals. The rest of his Dec. 20 letter is all crap he got from other parrots in the pet store.

The right-wing party has control of both New Hampshire (legislative) houses and fighting like children about who will be speaker of the House.The Washington right-wingers don't have a clue of what to do.

Mr. Meade's half-page column was nicely written I know full well what Ho stands for (Ho has been my initials forever). We have decided what we think of each other in the past. I have a theme song for your playbook full of parrots as follows: "I'm just a lonely boy, lonely and blue, all I want is someone to talk to." Ho, ho, ho.

Henry Osmer
Hill

Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 December 2014 07:05

Hits: 298

Wall Street, big corporations have done very well under Obama

To The Daily Sun,

For the past six years my "know it all' friend has been telling me that Obama was a DINO, a continuation of the previous administration, a lap dog for Wall Street, a representative for big oil, big corporations, big insurance. I didn't believe him.

On March 9, 2009, former George W. Bush adviser Michael Boskin wrote this tidbit: "Obama's radicalism is killing the Dow." The Dow is at 18,000 now with a 171 percent return since Boskin's op-ed. The economy is growing at its fastest pace in ten years. This is what should be the last evidence that one would need to prove my friend's dastardly accusations.

But go ahead and continue to listen to racist polemics instead.

George Maloof

Plymouth

Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 December 2014 06:57

Hits: 243

Many young people will try alcohol for 1st time during holidays

To The Daily Sun,

The winter holidays are a time to enjoy the company of family, friends and co-workers. Holiday parties are often a highlight of the season, but they also give young people more opportunities to misuse drugs and alcohol. This is a concern, and unfortunately the holiday season can be a time of risk for young people. On an average December day, more than 11,000 young people, aged 12 to 17, will use alcohol for the first time. Some of these young adults will not make it to the New Year, as nearly 400 young people under age 21 die from alcohol-related causes every month.

The holiday season is often a blur of family gatherings and celebrations, and more often than not, alcohol is present. The fridge and the liquor cabinets are stocked, parents are distracted by relatives and dinner preparations, and older siblings or college-age friends are around. The result is an increase in drug- and alcohol-related tragedies. According to Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), at least 50 percent of all deadly car crashes that take place during the holiday season involve alcohol. Creating a safe environment and encouraging healthy behaviors saves lives.

The widespread availability of alcohol at holiday parties gives our teens and pre-teens many opportunities to sneak alcohol when no one is looking, or convince a relative to let them enjoy "just one" alcoholic beverage. And some parents may be more inclined to let their teenagers have an alcoholic drink to share in a family toast or otherwise share in "the holiday spirits." On a local level, 47.8 percent Franklin Middle School students who ever had a drink of alcohol say they obtained it by having someone give it to them.

Where's the harm in that? Let's take a look.

• The younger a child is when he/she starts to drink, the higher the chances of having alcohol-related problems later in life.

• Alcohol use by teens affects still-developing cognitive abilities and impairs memory and learning.

• Teens who drink are more likely to commit or be the victim of violence (including sexual assault) and to experience stress, depression, and suicidal thoughts.

There are some simple things that you can do to lessen the exposure of your children to holiday substance abuse. Consider these holiday celebration tips:

• At your holiday gatherings, offer plenty of non-alcoholic foods, drinks and activities.

• Model responsible behavior by making sure that guests who have been drinking do not drive.

• Let your child know what to expect. Tell your child that adults may be drinking during the holidays, but under no circumstances is a child allowed to drink alcohol.

• To lower the risk of alcohol poisoning, be sure to throw out partially empty alcoholic drinks. Children love to imitate adults, and if they have access to leftover drinks they may be tempted to taste the contents. Children are much more sensitive to alcohol than adults.

Alcohol is found in beer, wine and distilled liquor, such as vodka, whiskey, rum or bourbon. It is also in perfumes, aftershave lotions, and mouthwashes. Did you know that vanilla and almond extracts also have high alcohol content? Make sure to keep all of these products out of the reach of children.

• Parents, grandparents and babysitters should also be extra cautious during the holidays. Visitors often leave medicines on a nightstand or in the bathroom, making them easily accessible to children. Medications given to seniors often do not have child-resistant closures, allowing children to open them with very little difficulty. Also, purses of visitors may contain medicines and other potentially dangerous items. Remember that the homes of friends and relatives may not be poison-proof, particularly if children do not live there.

Each year, about 4,700 people die as a result of underage drinking. Data from a national survey of high school students shows that teens who receive a message from their parents that underage drinking is completely unacceptable are more than 80 percent less likely to drink than teens who receive other messages. It is crucial for parents to have ongoing, intentional conversations with their teens — talking honestly about alcohol and drug misuse can have a real impact.

We all want the best for our families, so why not create some substance-free holiday traditions for your family? It's a great way to show your child that you can have fun during the holidays without alcohol or drugs. For tips and tools to help start the conversation about drug and alcohol misuse with your teen, click on the link for the Franklin Mayor's Drug Task Force at www.franklinnh.org.

Wishing you a safe and wonderful holiday season.

Angela Lynch

Franklin Mayor's Drug Task Force

Last Updated on Monday, 22 December 2014 10:12

Hits: 231

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