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Senior Citizens should really want Obamacare to be successful

To The Daily Sun,

On Page 18 of the AARP Bulletin for March 2014 is a very good article on Medicare. As seniors, we know that AARP is a very powerful advocate for us. I recommend that you read the article for yourself.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA), also called Obamacare, has language that protects guaranteed benefits and "the good news for Medicare recipients is new protections and benefits in the health law that strengthens Medicare and give more coverage" says Nancy LeaMond, an officer for AARP.

That the ACA cut Medicare by $716 billion is taken out of context and has been used in advertisements for political gain. It is not like taking $716 billion out of a bank account as implied in the ads. The ads are deliberately misleading.

The ACA does a great deal for seniors. People in the "doughnut hole" have saved over $8 billion since 2010.

The Part A trust fund insurance has been extended to 2026. The medical profession is under pressure from the ACA to improve efficiency and put some controls on costs.

It is my opinion that seniors should really want the Affordable Care Act to be successful. It has a positive impact on Medicare for both present and future recipients. Seniors should also be wary of politicians who advocate for its repel without explaining how they would guarantee benefits for Medicare.

Paul Bonneville

Lochmere (Tilton)

Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 April 2014 09:21

Hits: 141

Wicwas Lake Grange, now largest in N.H., will host open house

To The Daily Sun,

The Wicwas Lake Grange is a non-profit fraternal organization located in Meredith that does a significant amount of community service, including donating dictionaries to third-graders in schools located in the Lakes Region. In 2010, the Wicwas Lake Grange was in danger of closing its doors for good, due to a decline in membership. With the community's help, the Wicwas Lake Grange has grown from 10 members to nearly 100 members, making the Wicwas Lake Grange the largest Grange in the state of New Hampshire.

A little history of the New Hampshire Grange that people may not know. The Grange is responsible for the Rural Free Delivery program of the United States Post Office. The Grange is responsible for local libraries that have now become community public libraries. The Grange lobbied for the New Hampshire State Police Force and helped to establish the New Hampshire University System Agricultural Stations.

It is with great honor to recognize our long-time members who have outstanding years of service with the Wicwas Lake Grange. On Saturday, April 12, 2014, from 1-4 p.m., at the Wicwas Lake Grange, located at 150 Meredith Center Road in Meredith, the Wicwas Lake Grange will be holding its annual Open House to the public and recognizing their outstanding members for their years of service. Those names include Irene Greenleaf, 70 years; Joanne Berry, Mary Chamberlain, 65 years; Patricia Chamberlain, 55 years; Wayne Blake, 50 years; Linda Phelps, 40 years; Dana Lowe, 35 years; and Faith Clark, 25 years.

We will also be giving out the Meredith 2014 Citizen of the Year Award. Along with the recognition awards and the Citizen of the Year award, there will be displays for the dictionary project, history of the Grange, Junior Grange, UNH Agricultural display and a Maple Sapping display. The public is invited to attend the Open House.

Again, a very special "thank you" to our outstanding members.

Helga Paquin

Wicwas Lake Grange Secretary

Meredith

Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 April 2014 09:18

Hits: 223

Remember, New Hampshire does not need new energy facilities

To The Daily Sun,

Iberdrola announced they are "pausing" on the Wild Meadows Wind Farm. Yet, local residents aren't listening, mainly because they're still seeing work being conducted. Land is being cleared, studies are happening and utility trucks are seen frequently in the area.

The rumor behind the scene, on the so called "pause," is twofold: First: Iberdrola is being told by the state to fix the Groton mess, and second: the summer residents are coming. It's complicated, petty and political — but it's clearly an active construction site.

There are nine renewable energy plants and proposals within seven miles of Newfound Lake's shoreline. We're destined to become the state's largest renewable energy corridor with eight power plants and part of the Northern Pass project. Four of these will be wind power plants, two bio-mass plants, two hydro plants and part of the Northern Pass power line project.

Residents have consistently voted against additional wind power plants in the community. Their true concerns are: 1) watershed concerns, 2) lack of decommissioning funds, 3) safety concerns, 4) property value concerns, 5) tourism concerns, 6) jobs concerns 7) wildlife concerns, 8) sound concerns, 9) visual concerns and 10) legal issues at the Groton Wind Plant.

True concerns, lots of politics and very little answers are playing out. We're asking our leaders in Concord to protect businesses and residents alike. Why should New Hampshire businesses and residents pay higher electrical prices for electricity destined for southern states?

New Hampshire has been in the business of exporting excess electricity for decades and much of that money has helped New Hampshire residents. How does a foreign wind company taking profits, not only out-of-state but out-of-our-country, make sense for New Hampshire? And will our current power plants export less electricity because of it? That would be a worse-case scenario for New Hampshire.

Why are we paying to power southern states? Why are foreign energy companies being allowed to cut into our electricity exporting program (a proven program that our state has perfected and prospered from for decades) by entertaining the thought of an "unreliable" intermittent wind power source.

Remember: We don't have a "'need" for new energy facilities — this is all being driven by southern states. New Hampshire has more than enough "reliable" energy sources at hand. We have more than enough reliable electricity, we don't need more, let alone intermittent electricity.

Ray Cunningham

Bridgewater

Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 April 2014 09:13

Hits: 82

Ode to Kimball Castle - 2014

I stand in granite grandeur, watching the boats go by-
To this day- some large, some small- they wave-
I see the islands of the Big Lake beckon me, to stand tall-
My view is 300 degrees of The Broads-
Do not ruin my view by crushing my skeleton, my sight-

I will not fall willfully-
I am of English Oak and local granite-
I am steadfast- I still breathe-
Why am I the only one speaking for myself?

Charlotte Kimball willed me as a "nature preserve"-
She even funded it, forever-
You callously diverted the funds, desiring to segment my land for profit-
Shame on you- Greenbacks over Nature?

Bengamin built me in 1897 to 1899- I am older than you-
Italian stone-makers and laborers made me strong-
The men were housed on the Lady of the Lake at the base of my land-
She was moored there for them to reside, until my doors were opened-

I am the "Lady of Locke Hill," as well-
People have hiked me, they have skied me- that was the intent, now lost in thicket and overgrowth, and shattered stone-
Now you see me as a cairn, a Joshua pile of stones, not a home, not a castle-
Cairns guide you forward; You take me backwards-

I still see the lake, the boats and the mountains-
Do not destroy me- I am still useful-
I am a Castle, a Fortress and I will not go easily into the night-
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J P Polidoro 1-14-14

Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 April 2014 09:07

Hits: 79

Repair work on Lower Bay Road can't wait until 2015

To The Daily Sun,

The state Department of Transportation — DOT — has accepted a application for the repair of Lower Bay Road in Sanbornton. Of course this on the agenda for 2015. Sanbornton cannot wait for 2015. An ambulance or fire truck would destroy their vehicle responding to an emergency.

Has any of the public officials driven our state/town road? This has gone on long enough without repairs. I believe two or three signs have been put up for frost heaves and, the best part, orange reflective paint has been sprayed on the worst of the dips and pot holes. What about cold patch or tar for repair? This road is a danger to the general public and concern for vehicle damage and danger to the public.

This road winds around the lake and soon the summer locals will be out in force to utilize this so-called road. Our Sanbornton community has put this repair off long enough, so please step up to the plate and do something this year. I urge all town residents and locals who use this roadway for a shortcut through from Meredith to Tilton to call local officials and demand a fix.

The final request is for the local government agencies to drive the road in there own cars and see what the problem is. So get the word out and complain. Demand action at least some cold patch and tar for the hundreds of holes and dips. Keep the big trucks off the road.

Douglas Rasp
Sanbornton

Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 April 2014 09:03

Hits: 126

 
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