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Remember, New Hampshire does not need new energy facilities

To The Daily Sun,

Iberdrola announced they are "pausing" on the Wild Meadows Wind Farm. Yet, local residents aren't listening, mainly because they're still seeing work being conducted. Land is being cleared, studies are happening and utility trucks are seen frequently in the area.

The rumor behind the scene, on the so called "pause," is twofold: First: Iberdrola is being told by the state to fix the Groton mess, and second: the summer residents are coming. It's complicated, petty and political — but it's clearly an active construction site.

There are nine renewable energy plants and proposals within seven miles of Newfound Lake's shoreline. We're destined to become the state's largest renewable energy corridor with eight power plants and part of the Northern Pass project. Four of these will be wind power plants, two bio-mass plants, two hydro plants and part of the Northern Pass power line project.

Residents have consistently voted against additional wind power plants in the community. Their true concerns are: 1) watershed concerns, 2) lack of decommissioning funds, 3) safety concerns, 4) property value concerns, 5) tourism concerns, 6) jobs concerns 7) wildlife concerns, 8) sound concerns, 9) visual concerns and 10) legal issues at the Groton Wind Plant.

True concerns, lots of politics and very little answers are playing out. We're asking our leaders in Concord to protect businesses and residents alike. Why should New Hampshire businesses and residents pay higher electrical prices for electricity destined for southern states?

New Hampshire has been in the business of exporting excess electricity for decades and much of that money has helped New Hampshire residents. How does a foreign wind company taking profits, not only out-of-state but out-of-our-country, make sense for New Hampshire? And will our current power plants export less electricity because of it? That would be a worse-case scenario for New Hampshire.

Why are we paying to power southern states? Why are foreign energy companies being allowed to cut into our electricity exporting program (a proven program that our state has perfected and prospered from for decades) by entertaining the thought of an "unreliable" intermittent wind power source.

Remember: We don't have a "'need" for new energy facilities — this is all being driven by southern states. New Hampshire has more than enough "reliable" energy sources at hand. We have more than enough reliable electricity, we don't need more, let alone intermittent electricity.

Ray Cunningham

Bridgewater

Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 April 2014 09:13

Hits: 67

Ode to Kimball Castle - 2014

I stand in granite grandeur, watching the boats go by-
To this day- some large, some small- they wave-
I see the islands of the Big Lake beckon me, to stand tall-
My view is 300 degrees of The Broads-
Do not ruin my view by crushing my skeleton, my sight-

I will not fall willfully-
I am of English Oak and local granite-
I am steadfast- I still breathe-
Why am I the only one speaking for myself?

Charlotte Kimball willed me as a "nature preserve"-
She even funded it, forever-
You callously diverted the funds, desiring to segment my land for profit-
Shame on you- Greenbacks over Nature?

Bengamin built me in 1897 to 1899- I am older than you-
Italian stone-makers and laborers made me strong-
The men were housed on the Lady of the Lake at the base of my land-
She was moored there for them to reside, until my doors were opened-

I am the "Lady of Locke Hill," as well-
People have hiked me, they have skied me- that was the intent, now lost in thicket and overgrowth, and shattered stone-
Now you see me as a cairn, a Joshua pile of stones, not a home, not a castle-
Cairns guide you forward; You take me backwards-

I still see the lake, the boats and the mountains-
Do not destroy me- I am still useful-
I am a Castle, a Fortress and I will not go easily into the night-
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J P Polidoro 1-14-14

Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 April 2014 09:07

Hits: 58

Repair work on Lower Bay Road can't wait until 2015

To The Daily Sun,

The state Department of Transportation — DOT — has accepted a application for the repair of Lower Bay Road in Sanbornton. Of course this on the agenda for 2015. Sanbornton cannot wait for 2015. An ambulance or fire truck would destroy their vehicle responding to an emergency.

Has any of the public officials driven our state/town road? This has gone on long enough without repairs. I believe two or three signs have been put up for frost heaves and, the best part, orange reflective paint has been sprayed on the worst of the dips and pot holes. What about cold patch or tar for repair? This road is a danger to the general public and concern for vehicle damage and danger to the public.

This road winds around the lake and soon the summer locals will be out in force to utilize this so-called road. Our Sanbornton community has put this repair off long enough, so please step up to the plate and do something this year. I urge all town residents and locals who use this roadway for a shortcut through from Meredith to Tilton to call local officials and demand a fix.

The final request is for the local government agencies to drive the road in there own cars and see what the problem is. So get the word out and complain. Demand action at least some cold patch and tar for the hundreds of holes and dips. Keep the big trucks off the road.

Douglas Rasp
Sanbornton

Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 April 2014 09:03

Hits: 102

Local property tax relief included in N.H. Senate's casino bill

To The Daily Sun,

My letter is to make Laconia residents aware of Senate Bill 366, which is due to be heard Wednesday this week in the House, and to ask people to let our county delegation know they are interested in the local property tax relief included in the bill.

The bill passed by the Senate contains property tax relief in the form of reinstated revenue sharing money to local communities that was suspended in 2010 (which totaled about $50.4 million per biennium).

Based on the pre-2010 figures, Laconia, alone could expect to receive in the vicinity of $677,000 per year, or $1.354 million per biennium -- significant money.

One objection to expanded gaming historically is that New Hampshire did not have the regulatory structure needed. Since taken up last session, the Gaming Regulatory Oversight Authority put together a regulatory structure that has earned praise.

Gaming has long been a key revenue source for funding our state, as much as 10 percent. It's time to protect local property taxpayers' interests by not ceding it to our neighboring states, and it is time to recognize that not keeping up our state "gaming position" places a unfair burden on communities.

Please join me in support of SB-366.

Henry Lipman
City Councilor, Ward 3

Laconia

Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 April 2014 08:59

Hits: 289

Price of asphalt has quadrupled since last N.H. gas tax increase

To The Daily Sun,

It has been estimated that 37 percent of the state roads in New Hampshire are deemed in "poor condition," by the N.H. Department of Transportation. As a resident of the Town of Sandwich, I can verify that all the state-maintained roads in our town are in "poor condition." How did we get here and what can be done to meet the challenge?

The simple answer is that the state has dwindling funds to fix or maintain the roadways that serve our needs. Despite the limitations, the State Department of Transportation has done all it can to maintain the roads. Chris Clement, commissioner of Transportation estimates he has between $32 and $40 million a year to spend on winter maintenance that actually requires more than $100 million. Unfortunately, it costs about $50,000 a mile to resurface a road in decent condition and about $1,000,000 to fix a badly maintained road. In addition, roads less traveled are likely to be ignored and fall deeper and deeper into disrepair.

In the meantime, cars, trucks and buses constantly roll through our giant potholes caused by frost heaves that can raise the broken roadway more than seven inches. Town residents report steering, suspension and alignment problems. It's estimated by TRIP that these repairs can average between $300 and $500.

Roads less traveled can also have an affect on business and social gatherings about town. A trip of a few miles can take 20 minutes after slowing to four miles an hour while avoiding giant holes and cracks in the asphalt.

Unfortunately, repairing roads can be a political, as well as a personal issue. Anti-tax sentiment has consumed the good sense that once recognized that good roads make prosperous communities. The most short-sighted say, "If I don't use that road or bridge, do I really need it?" The sensible answer: "What good is a road that only goes to your house? Being able to drive on roads outside your neighborhood is a good idea."

As the New Hampshire Senate recently voted to raise the gas tax by four cents, Americans for Prosperity-NH came out strongly against the measure. This is the same organization funded by the Koch Brothers, the oil, gas and paper billionaires.

It is estimated that the new levy will bring in an additional $33 million into the general Highway Fund. New Hampshire has not had an increase in the gas tax since 1991 as asphalt charges have quadrupled and fuel-efficient cars bring in fewer gas tax dollars.

I encourage anyone who wants more funding for the Department of Transportation to call your State Representatives at 271-1110 and the governor at 271-2121.

Nick Vazzana
Sandwich

Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 April 2014 08:51

Hits: 414

 
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