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I'm prone to motion sickness & driving in circles induces nausea

To The Daily Sun,

Upon reviewing the Meredith3-25.com website, I printed the map to see how three new Meredith roundabouts would affect my personal driving. According to the Traffic Committee, peak congestion occurs "two days per weekend, 3-4 hours a day, for 10 weekends."So this is for 20 days — 60 to 80 hours — per year, but then comes the Big Disclaimer, that this plan is not going to actually prevent congestion (as personally evidenced at the Parade Road Roundabout during many traffic times).

Let's suppose I need to stop at Meredith Village Savings Bank before 3 p.m., then pick grandkids up at the school. In the most direct route, I would twirl around the Parade Road Roundabout, drive straight past businesses and the fire station, come into the Lake Street Roundabout, exit right, down to the Main Roundabout where the lights are now, bear right, pass the bank to the Pleasant Street Roundabout, drive 360 degrees and backtrack to the bank. Upon exiting the drive-through, I have to backtrack to the Main Roundabout, enter two lanes of moving traffic, drive 360 degrees to exit on the same road, pass the bank again, take the second exit at the Pleasant Street Roundabout, and continue to the school. It gives new meaning to the phrase, "Can't get there from here!".

Oddly enough, my drivers license allows me to turn left, so why is it so unsafe now, especially when none of the proposed changes are based on accident statistics? Another disconcerting fact is that the Traffic Committee did not seek input from the school bus company, fire, police, ambulance, or DPW. Town departments were only asked for comments at an internal meeting on December 23, after the plan was submitted to the Selectboard. Their many concerns are well worth reading, especially the one that notes, "The Lake Street Roundabout was not designed to accommodate ladder (fire) truck access to Lake Street," or, that for safety and maintenance, the median centers should be concrete.

A major cause for traffic congestion include pedestrians dribbling across the road in the crosswalk at Dover Street from the shops to the lake. This proposed plan keeps that pedestrian crosswalk, and also adds four crosswalks at each roundabout, ample opportunity for many more to dribble here and there. The premise that the pedestrians can stop at each median to wait for traffic to pass is wrong.State law gives them the right of way in crosswalks without signals, so traffic will back up in the circles and Rte. 3 in both directions to let them pass. In what world is it safer for pedestrians to cross over one or two lanes of moving traffic than to have a designated light assuring safe passage?

A few years ago, the town planners and leaders of the Greater Meredith Program went berserk when the MVSB installed an electric sign. An emergency Town Meeting was called to forbid any "like" signage that might destroy our "village character". With a third of this Traffic Advisory Committee coming from the Greater Meredith Program, it's director, a founder, and an Executive Board member, I can't believe that they condone the 20 plus reflective, directional signs that come with each roundabout. Add those to the Mills Falls Marketplace sign poles, the tent signs advertising Main Street businesses, crafts fairs, concrete medians, and Hesky Park events, this .3 mile corridor will be confusing and ugly.

My last reason for not liking this plan is that I am prone to motion sickness and driving in circles makes me nauseous.

The Public Hearing for this proposal is January 26 at 6 p.m. in the I-LHS Auditorium.Please contact the members of the Meredith Selectboard at the following e-mail addresses to add your input: Carla Horne, Chair — This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Peter Brothers, Vice Chair — This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Nate Torr — This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Hillary Seeger — This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and Lou Kahn — This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Free money is never FREE and this will have a cost to Meredith taxpayers with year round upkeep.

There is a petition for Meredith residents being circulated by individuals and businesses asking the Selectboard to NOT approve this roundabout plan. I have a copy and for those wishing to sign, please contact me at 279-5682 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Unfortunately, the nearly full petition at Plum Crazy Pizza on Main Street recently "disappeared".

Karen Sticht

Meredith

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Safety Institute doesn't endorse roundabouts for all applications

To The Daily Sun,

With the Meredith Selectboard approaching a vote on a multimillion-dollar three-roundabout proposal for the downtown area whose construction will take all or parts of the 2017 and 2018 construction seasons it is an appropriate time to learn more about roundabouts. There are many question surrounding roundabouts. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), roundabouts are appropriate at many intersections. Note; they specifically did not say they are appropriate for all applications.

So the question becomes where they are appropriate and where they are not appropriate? According to IIHS the places where they are appropriate are high crash locations and intersections with large traffic delays, complex geometry (more than four approach roads), frequent left-turn movements, and relatively balanced traffic flows. So do we know:

— Is Lake Street intersection considered a high crash location?

— Is Pleasant Street intersection considered a high crash location?

— Is the intersection of Routes 3 and 25 considered a high crash location?

— Is Lake Street intersection considered a location with large traffic delays?

— Is Pleasant Street intersection considered a location with large traffic delays?

— Is the intersection of Routes 3 and 25 considered a location with large traffic delays?

— Is Lake Street considered to have complex geometry?

— Is Pleasant Street considered to have complex geometry?

— Is the intersection of Routes 3 and 25 considered to have complex geometry?

— Is Lake Street considered a place where there are frequent left turn movements?

— Is Pleasant Street considered a place where there are frequent left turn movements?

— Is the intersection of Routes 3 and 25 considered place where there are frequent left turn movements?

— Does the Lake Street have relatively balanced traffic flows?

— Does the Pleasant Street have relatively balanced traffic flows?

— Does the intersection of Routes 3 and 25 have relatively balanced flows?

IIHS does not offer blanket support for roundabouts in all applications. They observe that sometimes space constraints or topography make it impossible to build a roundabout. Geometric design details vary from site to site and must take into account traffic volumes, land use, topography and other factors. Roundabouts often require more space in the immediate vicinity of the intersection than comparable traditional intersections.

Further, IIHS asserts intersections with highly unbalanced traffic flows (that is, very high traffic volumes on the main street and very light traffic on the side street) and isolated intersections in a network of traffic signals often are not ideal candidates for roundabouts.

What the concerns of the NHDOT and McFarland Johnson are with respect to the advisory committee's "3 roundabout" proposal have not been plainly articulated. But they are pointedly stopping short of endorsing the proposal. There is no engineering data for review. It is difficult to ascertain the thought process here.

Users of these intersections and businesses in the affected area need to get informed about this proposed project and get involved. Please reach out to the selectboard with your concerns as they are readying a vote on the matter. They can be reached by email at: Nate Torr This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Peter Brothers, Vice Chair This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Carla Horne, Chair This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Lou Kahn This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Hillary Seeger This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Marc Abear

Meredith

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