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Many who complain about what's wrong are living the good life

To The Daily Sun,
I would like to thank G.W. Brooks for his letter written June 27 in The Daily Sun. There are those who live the good life in this country but continue to complain about it on almost a daily basis.
I celebrated Memorial Day this year by visiting again the traveling Vietnam wall in North Haverill, N.H. My first viewing was was years ago in Meredith. I took with me a copy of a Life magazine dated June 27, 1969.The headline reads THE FACES OF THE AMERICAN DEAD IN VIETNAM — ONE WEEK'S TOLL. The magazine has photos of each one of the those killed that week. I made a list of two I knew, plus three from N.H. who died that week. This article covers the week of May 28 to June 3, 1969, which would have been Memorial Day week 44 years ago. I visited the three N.H. troopers, plus the two I knew. Later, as I sat in the bleachers, I listened to the guest speakers tell of their experiences and staring at the wall, the tears came. I felt great praise for those who answered their countries call to serve, whether they agreed with it or not. The speakers told of their year or years they spent in "NAM". The anger they spoke about was the welcome home they received. I will skip the rest of this part of the story as everyone knows what happened to us on returning "HOME".
I, as a career soldier, served 2.5 years in Vietnam, a year before that in Thailand. I know next to nothing about those who continue to write letters of a negative attitude about most everything wrong with this country. What I can tell is that some of them are well educated, are living the good life our fighting men and women fought and died to keep. It would be enlightening to me if they would explain just once what they have done for this country and just what they have done to make it better. I, as have millions of others, have spent parts of our lives on foreign soil and greatly appreciate the country we live in. I will always wonder if those who are protesting today were part of the group that made life miserable for us when we returned home. It is well known that less than 1 percent of Americans serve in the military, so the least you can do is show some respect to those that do. To those who have served THANK YOU AND WELCOME HOME
Henry Osmer
Hill

Last Updated on Wednesday, 03 July 2013 10:17

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Overreaching? 80% of GOP senators voted for Civil Rights Act

To the editor,
I often find Mr. Maloof's letters to be interesting or amusing. However, I found his letter in Tuesday's issue of The Daily Sun strange . . . very strange. For example. He seems to believe that the "conservative mindset" has to do with old people as, in his view, the term "young Republicans" is " . . . oxymoronic . . . sort of like "compassionate Republican" or "gospel truth". He then goes on to say that the term conservatives would be attached to more mature people — especially the ones you can fool all the time. Please keep those phrases in mind as we look at Mr. Maloof's following statements. First, he said that conservatives " . . . have seen the nation decline in so many ways . . . (moral, economic, prestige, etc). They want to hang on to the past while it keeps slipping away." And he says that conservative get angry rather than apathetic. I have to ask, has anyone checked to see what's in the drinking water at Plymouth State?
In those few words, Mr. Maloof appears to be making an argument that a nation with declining morals, a staggering economy, that is losing respect around the world, is really what we all should espouse. And, he demeans Republicans for not being "apathetic" about it. That sort of logic deserves a resounding oy vey!
Mr. Maloof also posits that the religious right, fundamentalists, are notorious for "overreaching". To make his point he wrote the following: "They overreached in 1925 with the Skopes monkey trial; they overreached in 1933 with the abolishment of prohibition; they overreached in 1964 with the Civil Rights Act; and in 1965 with the Immigration and Nationality Act . . .". A few important factual corrections need to be made. The first is that what has been popularly termed the Scopes Monkey Trial was brought about by the ACLU filing suit over Tennessee's Butler Act. That act, passed by Tennessee's Democrat Legislature, and signed into laws by Tennessee's Democrat Governor, prohibited teaching the theory of evolution in the classroom. John T. Scopes was the teacher who violated that act. The question for Mr. Maloof is, where is the Republican overreach in this all Democrat and ACLU story.
The next factual correction has to do with Mr. Maloof's claim that the Republican's overreached with the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. The facts are that in 1964, with Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson as president, the U.S. Senate had 66 Democrats and 34 Republicans; a filibuster proof majority. However, that bill would not have passed without the votes of 80 perecent of the Republican Senators as only two thirds of Democrats voted for the bill. So the question to be posed is, does Mr. Maloof believe it was wrong to pass the Civil Rights Act?
In his next to last paragraph, I thought Mr. Maloof took a page out of Professor Sandy's playbook when he chose to label the Republican mindset as " . . . cognitive dissonance — a reaction between clearly held beliefs and undeniable evidence in opposition to those beliefs." . Quickly now Mr. Maloof, take a look in the Mirror.
Finally, when that small group of men met in Ripon, WI, and formed the Republican party for the expressed purpose of abolishing slavery, was that political overreach? When that very first Republican President, Abraham Lincoln, issued the Emancipation Proclamation, was that political overreach? And, when 630,000 people died in the effort to rid the scourge of slavery, was that political overreach? When those Republicans voted favorably for the Civil Rights Act of 1964, was that political overreach. When that group of Tennessee Democrats formed the Ku Klux Klan, was that political overreach?
Cognitive dissonance? You betcha!
Will someone please check the water at Plymouth State.
Bob Meade
Laconia

Last Updated on Wednesday, 03 July 2013 10:13

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Happy Independents Week! Stay, eat, shop local; pass the word

To The Daily Sun,
Belknap Independent Business Alliance (BIBA) is hosting Independents Week from July 1 through 7 in celebration of our nation's locally-owned, independent businesses. This nationwide campaign is designed to recognize the importance of economic democracy and community self-determination.
Independents Week is a week-long celebration praising local businesses for their commitment to individuality and efforts to keep economic prosperity within the community. We celebrate the spirit of entrepreneurism and individuality, as we recognize independent and locally-owned contributions of time, talent, goods and services.
While providing BIBA an opportunity to promote its members and raise awareness of the importance of local, independent businesses and the values they embody, we also take this week to honor the social fabric of our unique community and how much our local independent shops contribute to it.
In addition, this campaign demonstrates the importance of supporting local businesses to tourists, who visit the Lakes Region during this busy holiday, directing these visitors where to stay, eat and shop.
Happy Independents Week and remember Stay, Eat and Shop Local and pass the word!
Kate Bishop Hamel
Executive Director
BIBA

Last Updated on Wednesday, 03 July 2013 10:06

Hits: 270

Delegation needs to take the same tour selectboards are taking

To The Daily Sun,
I would like to thank the County Commissioners, Deb Shackett and the staff at Belknap County Corrections for a very informative and educational tour on Thursday.
In past years the commissioners would go out to towns and present updates called "County Conversations" to selectboards around the county.
This year your selectboards were invited to go to them and see what the different departments actually do, what we have accomplished with infrastructure and programs and what our needs are going forward. Which was a great idea; I personally learned new things about county and observed some interesting things.
We met at the court house and stopped at the several areas including Youth Services, County Attorney, Register of Deeds, and the court room.
The Youth Services gave us an update on new programs that they are implementing with a 68-77 percent success rate for adults and Juveniles. Great news!
We observed thousands of books dating back to the 1700s to book #1 at the Registry.
We also toured the exterior, new roof top heat pump units (viewed from the ground!), new windows and a new composite roof that has a 50 year warranty, all of this being paid with federal stimulus money. (I can hear two guys ranting "it's not free")
We then drove over to the County Complex. Starting in the administration wing which was renovated to allow those staff to work in a secure environment, we walked through the entire building.
We then had a tour of the Sheriff Dept. and dispatch area which was also very interesting.
Last stop was the corrections facility. Commissioner Thomas informed us that the building has had a span of construction projects which range from 1890 to 1988. Entering from the sheriff area, we walked down a long hallway and up a narrow set of stairs to "the old crutch factory" where there are 13 or so cots to house the women. Also up there is a bathroom with a shower, sink and toilet. It was also very hot. The women had been recently been moved to the "gym" because of the temperature in the crutch factory.
The rest of the facility was also viewed and I will simply say that the conditions are unsanitary, unsafe and unacceptable for the employees and for those incarcerated. I could go on for 20 pages describing what I observed but that is not the intent of this letter. The unacceptable behavior in the county arena has to change. The duty of the County Commissioners, which is the oldest form of county government in America, are to approve budgets, oversee spending and hire county employees, among other duties. The County Delegation seems to want both jobs. First off, the county budget is the responsibility of the commission, Second, how in the hell can the delegation control the budget when they have no idea what they are dealing with? For example, I asked how many delegation members had taken a tour like the one we had and the number was three — back in 2008. Really?! I suggest that the delegation schedule the very same tour that the selectboards are taking, I know they will learn something.
The situation with the county corrections facility is to a point where the answer is not yes or no, but rather how. There is a big difference between liberal and humanitarian and there is a big difference between spend and investment.
Selectman Carla Horne
Meredith

Last Updated on Tuesday, 02 July 2013 09:21

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Stay a safe distance away from fireworks to protect your hearing

To The Daily Sun,
As schools let out for summer and vacation gets into full swing, I urge readers to protect their own, and their children's, hearing. Noise-induced hearing loss cannot be reversed.
Summer brings a chorus of sweet sounds. But it also brings noise that can be harmful to our ears. Prolonged exposure to the roar of lawn mowers, power tools, motorized recreational vehicles, target shooting, concerts, loud sporting events, and fireworks all can wreak havoc on our hearing. In fact, the single bang of a firecracker at close range can permanently damage hearing in an instant, making it forever more difficult to hear the subtler sounds of summer.
While many noisy recreational activities are part of summer's delight, it is extremely important to take precautions to ensure that these activities do not damage our hearing.
Noise is one of the most common causes of hearing loss; both the loudness of the noise and the length of time you're exposed to it matter. However, by taking some simple measures, people can protect their hearing while still enjoying their summer activities.
Do all you can to limit the length of time you spend in a noisy environment. When you do participate in noisy activities, alternate them with periods of quiet. When you know you will be exposed to loud sounds, use earplugs. Disposable earplugs are typically available at local pharmacies. We also offer custom ear protection which will ensure a proper fitting mold, further reducing the risk of unwanted noise exposure.
When watching fireworks displays, stay a safe distance away, where you can enjoy the colors and lights, but not expose yourself and your family to loud noises. To protect your hearing, make sure you are wearing earplugs and that they are securely in place before the show begins; and, be sure to keep them in for the entire show. Even firecrackers pose a risk to your hearing as they produce sounds starting at more than 40 decibels above what OSHA considers unsafe which presents the risk of irreversible ear damage.
When listening to smartphones and MP3 players, keep them at a low volume. This can be a tough thing to monitor with children and teens but it's important to limit their volume with the use of headphones and ear-buds. If they can't understand a conversational-level voice at arm's length away, it's too loud.
Protect against swimmer's ear by making sure to dry ears completely after swimming. Do your best to drain any residual water from your ear canal. Also, monitor the bacterial count when swimming at the beach. Many beaches post signs. Stay out of the water on the days that the bacterial counts are high. If you are still concerned, a few drops of white vinegar in each ear canal will help reduce troubles.
We often take our hearing for granted, but the truth is that hearing loss, especially when left unaddressed, affects our quality of life. Hearing is a significant connection to the world, and we should do all we can to protect it.
The cells of the ear that are the first to be damaged or die are those that allow us to hear higher-frequency sounds clearly, like the sounds of birds singing and children speaking. Ironically, these are the sounds my clients report missing the most.
Repeated exposure to loud noise, over an extended period of time, presents serious risks to hearing health as well. If you have to shout over the noise to be heard by someone within arm's length, the noise is probably in the dangerous range. Warning signs include pain in your ears after leaving a noisy area, ringing or buzzing (tinnitus) in your ears immediately after exposure to noise or you suddenly have difficulty understanding speech after exposure to noise (you can hear people talking but cannot understand them).
Please enjoy your summer, but not at the risk of your hearing. Family gatherings, visiting grandchildren, attending summer's many concerts and the sound of summer song birds are the things you will miss one day if you don't take measures to protect your hearing today.
Laura Robertson
Doctor of Audiology
Laconia

Last Updated on Tuesday, 02 July 2013 09:17

Hits: 556

 
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