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Emerald Ash Borer is already killing trees along Concord streets

To The Daily Sun,

We all know ash makes great firewood, and in light of the spread of the emerald ash borer (EAB) continuing to increase its range here in New Hampshire, we may have a lot more sooner than we would like. Recently Belknap County was added to the quarantine list since the adult bug was found in both in Belmont and Gilmanton EAB monitoring traps. If you are an ash tree owner in the quarantine area and this hasn't raised any red flags for you yet, it should.

In Concord where EAB was first discovered in 2013, EAB is already killing trees along the streets and in people's yards. This will continue as the population of EAB steadily grows and the destructive larvae decimate the conductive tissue in the trees. This will eventually happen as the insect population builds seeking out new victims. All ash, white, green and black are susceptible to the insect We have learned from other infested states that once an area has EAB it takes about seven years for nearly all ash to die without some sort of intervention.

In Detroit where the insect was first discovered in 2002 they have seen 99 percent mortality.

This will cost homeowners, businesses, and communities thousands of dollars in tree removals.

So what is one to do? Throw up their hands and wait for the inevitable? No, there are options and opportunities to plan ahead as well as intervention to treat highly valued landscape ash for the insect before it's too late. Planning ahead could mean planting another species near your ash tree to eventually take its place, or contacting a reputable tree care company to assess the tree.

They will be able to provide an estimate of cost to treat the tree with a pesticide, or possibly remove it. Treated ash trees can theoretically last as long as the treatment continues, but may succumb at some point. The decision to treat or not to treat can be used to extend the survival of the tree in order to spread out the inevitable removal. A high value landscape ash tree may be well worth the effort to protect it.

Communities and property managers should start assessing their landscape trees now. The loss will make a sudden impact in many communities leaving everyone pointing fingers and looking for money to address the problem. Taking the time to explore your options early will allow you to have some control over the demise of your tree as well as your tree removal budget. Purdue University has an online cost calculator that can be found at this site www.extension.entm.purdue.edu/treecomputer/ which estimates the cost of removal base d on the size of the tree. Be proactive, it is not too early to start evaluating your options and planning ahead. For further information and resources please visit www.nhbugs.org

Scott K. Rolfe, Community Forester

N.H. Division of Forests and Lands

Planning and Community Forestry Bureau

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The burning of fossil fuels uses stunning amounts of water

To The Daily Sun,

I greatly enjoyed Tony Boutin's latest letter on the economic catastrophe that has befallen us due to Democrats and the evils of scientific consensus regarding climate change. His letter is a parade of hilarious Chicken Little alarmism. Tony has consistently played all the cards of science denial: fake experts, cherry picking, delusional magnification of minority opinion, fallacious reasoning, and most entertaining of all, conspiracy theories. After all, climate change science is being used to destroy capitalism! It's a vast left wing conspiracy. Just ask Russ and Don.

I recently said to Don Ewing, "The debate on climate change is pretty much settled among climate scientists. Like evolution, it's now the details that are being explored ..." This is fact. That is the present consensus. It's not 100 percent because no scientific explanation can be 100 percent certain. It is "pretty much settled." The degree of certainty is very high in the climate science community. One can go with scientists in the know or Internet neckbeards and right-wing corporate funded "think" tanks. What an oxymoron.

I could have a delicious time responding to all the conspiracy lunacy of Tony's letter but I would rather just point out that free market fundamentalist alarmists like Tony and his crowd of glassy-eyed tin-foil hat wearers have lost the debate in the highest places of scientific knowledge, policy making, and even the majority of people. The well funded climate denial machine is increasingly being ignored as strident and unreasonable. This is fact. Mr Boutin's appreciation of climate science clearly ranks with Mr. Demakowski's appreciation of evolutionary science. They fit the science to their beliefs, which is doing it backward. Science denial is just plain weird (and suspect) after a point whether it's creationism, anti-vaxxers, or climate change denial.

Last year, 53 percent of this country's new energy capacity was in renewables. So far in 2015, its is a 2-to-1 ratio, around 67 percent so far. The market is still rocking so its time to retire the climate denial memes and find another brand of fear mongering to purvey. States are increasingly passing legislation to ensure that actual climate science is being taught. Iowa just signed this into law. Wyoming, Hawaii and Minnesota have recently joined the crowd, too. The small city of Georgetown, Texas, decided in March to go 100 percent renewable. Why? Costs, both human and economic.

We could be facing water problems in the future yet climate change deniers don't tell you that fossil fuel burning uses stunning amounts of water which crops and yes, people, require. Yes, people. Air quality and health issues are also major issues to normal people even if Tony and the Tin Foils want to suck down or drink "harmless" industrial emissions because they are of course, just "nutrients."

James Veverka
Tilton

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