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Remember, New Hampshire does not need new energy facilities

To The Daily Sun,

Iberdrola announced they are "pausing" on the Wild Meadows Wind Farm. Yet, local residents aren't listening, mainly because they're still seeing work being conducted. Land is being cleared, studies are happening and utility trucks are seen frequently in the area.

The rumor behind the scene, on the so called "pause," is twofold: First: Iberdrola is being told by the state to fix the Groton mess, and second: the summer residents are coming. It's complicated, petty and political — but it's clearly an active construction site.

There are nine renewable energy plants and proposals within seven miles of Newfound Lake's shoreline. We're destined to become the state's largest renewable energy corridor with eight power plants and part of the Northern Pass project. Four of these will be wind power plants, two bio-mass plants, two hydro plants and part of the Northern Pass power line project.

Residents have consistently voted against additional wind power plants in the community. Their true concerns are: 1) watershed concerns, 2) lack of decommissioning funds, 3) safety concerns, 4) property value concerns, 5) tourism concerns, 6) jobs concerns 7) wildlife concerns, 8) sound concerns, 9) visual concerns and 10) legal issues at the Groton Wind Plant.

True concerns, lots of politics and very little answers are playing out. We're asking our leaders in Concord to protect businesses and residents alike. Why should New Hampshire businesses and residents pay higher electrical prices for electricity destined for southern states?

New Hampshire has been in the business of exporting excess electricity for decades and much of that money has helped New Hampshire residents. How does a foreign wind company taking profits, not only out-of-state but out-of-our-country, make sense for New Hampshire? And will our current power plants export less electricity because of it? That would be a worse-case scenario for New Hampshire.

Why are we paying to power southern states? Why are foreign energy companies being allowed to cut into our electricity exporting program (a proven program that our state has perfected and prospered from for decades) by entertaining the thought of an "unreliable" intermittent wind power source.

Remember: We don't have a "'need" for new energy facilities — this is all being driven by southern states. New Hampshire has more than enough "reliable" energy sources at hand. We have more than enough reliable electricity, we don't need more, let alone intermittent electricity.

Ray Cunningham

Bridgewater

 
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