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50 New Hampshire towns can express displeaure with Citizens United on Tuesday

To The Daily Sun,

At March town voting this year, more than 60 New Hampshire towns can voice displeasure about the Supreme Court's decision in Citizens United vs. FEC. Citizens United is not about citizens, but is about corporations, declaring them people. The bad problem this makes crosses party lines, letting corporations with big money, and also unions, contribute anonymously to political campaigns.

Corporations do not run for office. Corporations do not vote. Corporations pay taxes not by personal tax codes, but by corporate tax codes. When corporations break the law, they pay fines, whereas, people go to prison. All rational signs are corporations are not people.

Pre-Citizens United decision by our U.S. Supreme Court, candidates spent money contributions frugally, advertising their candidacy message. But introducing anonymous, big money began the avalanche of dismal, anti-other ads. Small donations by voters vs. big money — whose voice gets heard?

Corporations do not seek the approval of the shareholders or employees to commit corporate money. They commit the money in their own interest, meaning they know that campaigns they support will return the favor. This is corruption.

At the New Hampshire Statehouse hearing before Senate committee on March 4, I heard a Republican member of the public testify he doesn't want his Republican senator defeated by anonymous, big money. This concern is the same voiced by Democrats in the hearing room.

Please vote in favor of this Warrant Article on March 11. You will be asking for a constitutional amendment effort that gets us to this democracy-saving goal: Corporations are not people.

Lynn Rudmin Chong

Sanbornton

 
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