Letter Submission

To submit a letter to the editor, please email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Letters must contain the author's name, hometown (state as well, if not in New Hampshire) and phone number, but the number will not be published. We do not run anonymous letters. Local issues get priority, as do local writers. We encourage writers to keep letters to no more than 400 words, but will accept longer letters to be run on a space-available basis. Letters may be edited for spelling, grammar, punctuation and legal concerns.

 

Federal government has determined what it takes to clean clothes

  • Published in Letters

To the editor,

After 25 years, I had to replace my old Kenmore washer. The new one, a Kenmore, which looked very similar to the old standby. It had all of the bells and whistles as the old one EXCEPT that it does not clean the clothes. There is mystery in the way the new machines work their magic behind locked doors so to speak.

Well I finally tricked the machine by removing the cover interlock and spent a half hour watching the wonders of modern technology. For a full load, ...

To the editor,

After 25 years, I had to replace my old Kenmore washer. The new one, a Kenmore, which looked very similar to the old standby. It had all of the bells and whistles as the old one EXCEPT that it does not clean the clothes. There is mystery in the way the new machines work their magic behind locked doors so to speak.

Well I finally tricked the machine by removing the cover interlock and spent a half hour watching the wonders of modern technology. For a full load, the water doesn’t even cover the clothes. It gently agitates them, which in turn agitates me! After draining and spinning, the rinse cycle starts. Some bright new engineer figured that splashing water on the clothing while spinning them at a high rate of speed, would rinse the soap out. Wrong! It seems that now we have to purchase high efficiency detergent. That means there are no soap suds in the first place.

I called Sears and they sent out a very nice and reasonably competent repairman who put the machine through its cycles and then told me that all was right and that it was designed that way. The instructions said that the rinse cycle would default to a spray rinse. Now, default means that if all else fails, then this will happen.

It seems that YOUR government, the one that cannot solve the energy crisis in heating and fuel, has determined just what it takes to get your clothes clean! It has set the standard for washers somewhat as it did for low flow toilets that you have to flush twice (fodder for yet another article). I was told that all washers use the same standards no matter the price. AND Sears won’t take it back! It seems that I waited too long to do my research. This is just one more case of big brother deciding what is best for us! Does anyone out there know where I can get a slightly used five year old washer that will wash my clothes in just one cycle?

Earlon Beale

Laconia