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Pat Buchanan - Many had convicted Zimmerman in their hearts before trial even began

Trayvon Martin was an unarmed teenager walking home from a convenience store with Skittles and iced tea, when he was shot to death by a racist, profiling wannabe cop named George Zimmerman.

In the Big Media, which has relentlessly sought out the voices of those most incensed by the verdict in Sanford, Fla., that is how the Saga of Trayvon Martin is being told. And from listening to TV reports of the rage across black America, that is what is widely believed there.

But is that what happened? Well, not exactly.

Trayvon Martin was not shot while walking home.

He was shot after sucker-punching George Zimmerman, breaking his nose, knocking him down, jumping on top of him, beating him martial arts style and banging his head on a concrete walk, while Zimmerman screamed again and again, "Help me, help me."

This is what George Zimmerman said happened.

It is what the sole eyewitness to the fight, John Good, says happened. It is what Sanford police believed.

It is what the defense proved beyond a reasonable doubt. It is what that jury of six women came to believe.

Why, then, do so many in the black community believe Trayvon was profiled and murdered, when even most of the analysts on the cable news shows were saying in the last days of the trial that the prosecution had failed completely to make its case?

Answer: Many had convicted George Zimmerman in their hearts before the trial began. Here, as this writer noted a year ago, are some of the voices that had declared Zimmerman guilty of murder before a witness had been called.

"Blacks are under attack," railed Jesse Jackson. "Killing us is big business." Trayvon was "shot down in cold blood by a vigilante ... murdered and martyred."

"A hate crime," said Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif. Rep. Hank Johnson, D-Ga., said Trayvon had been "executed."

The Grio compared his killing to the lynching of Emmett Till in Mississippi in 1955. The New Black Panther Party put Zimmerman's face on a "Wanted Dead or Alive" poster, called for 5,000 black men to run him down and said Trayvon had been "murdered in cold blood."

Spike Lee twittered Zimmerman's home address.

And President Obama? Did he calm the waters? Hardly. He signaled whose side he was on. "If I had a son, he'd look like Trayvon," he said.

Not only did they all inflame the black community into believing a racist atrocity had occurred, others still do so, even after the weeks of testimony that raised far more than a reasonable doubt.

Moments after the verdict, Al Sharpton ranted, "This is an atrocity." He went on to explain the moral outrage that the ladies of the jury had just committed.

"What this jury has done is establish a precedent that when you are young and fit a certain profile, you can be committing no crime, just bringing some Skittles and iced tea home to your brother, and be killed."

Did the ladies of the jury really establish such a "precedent"?

The four-term mayor of Washington, D.C., Marion Barry, has now brought his healing touch to the proceedings.

The Zimmerman verdict was "awful," he said, another example of "institutionalized racism." But look to Marion to find a bright side.

"The good news is that Zimmerman will never be in peace. He won't be able to get a job. He'll have to go underground, travel incognito and never live in peace. That's the good news for me." Now a comment like that might befit a James Earl Ray. But George Zimmerman? Who turned this neighborhood watch fellow, well-liked by all in his community, into some racist monster?

The night of the verdict, Mark O'Mara gave America the answer.

George "didn't know why he was turned into a monster," O'Mara told the assembled journalists. "But quite honestly, you guys had a lot to do with it. You took a story that was fed to you, and you ran with it, and you ran right over him, and that was horrid to him."

Like his partner Don West, O'Mara exhibited moral courage in that post-verdict press conference, as did that jury of six women, who rejected the prosection's pleas to at least give them manslaughter or child abuse.

President Obama might now exhibit a little moral courage of his own, by directing his Justice Department to halt this scavenger hunt for a "hate crime." If Sanford police and the FBI could not find a hate crime, and the prosecution could not prove racial profiling or malice, what reason is there to believe any such motive ever existed?

If Barack Obama and Eric Holder capitulate to Al Sharpton's demand for "Plan B" and the NAACP's demand for a second trial of George Zimmerman for a crime of which he has been acquitted, most Americans will come to believe this is no search for justice, but a drive for racial retribution and revenge. And they will be right.

End this persecution of George Zimmerman, Mr. President.

Shut it down.

(Syndicated columnist Pat Buchanan has been a senior advisor to three presidents, twice a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination and the presidential nominee of the Reform Party in 2000. He won the New Hampshire Republican Primary in 1996.)

Last Updated on Wednesday, 31 December 1969 07:00

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Froma Harrop - Curse of the full-time job

Free time is the great hunger for so many productive Americans, often trumping money. Studies show a huge desire for more self- and family-time, especially among parents. But Americans remain stuck in work schedules drawn up early last century. That doesn't make sense today, so why do we continue punching the old time clocks?
One big reason is that job benefits — above all, health coverage — typically require an eight-hour day, five days a week (or its equivalent). Note that the Affordable Care Act forces larger companies to cover only full-time workers, or pay a penalty.
Interestingly, the employer mandate was delayed due to confusion over what constitutes full-time employment. The law considers those putting in more than 30 hours a week or 130 hours a month full-time workers. But then, how do you count sick leave or temporary seasonal work? What do you do about visiting nurses, paid by the visit, not the hour? These things still need figuring out.
Last weekend, a cashier at my supermarket asked to be released at 3 p.m. so that she could go on to her next job. You can bet that this woman toils more hours than the average nine-to-fiver. You can also bet that none of her part-time jobs offers health benefits.
Lots of Americans are in her situation, which is why so many would prefer full-time positions. In June, more than 8 million part-timers tried unsuccessfully to secure full-time employment, according to the Labor Department.
Meanwhile, you hear mothers working outside the home wishing they could shorten their hours to spend more time with their children. Many report asking their employers for part-time arrangements and getting a "no."
Of course, certain jobs must be done in set shifts — police, emergency room doctors, assembly line workers. And workers must be physically together for projects demanding face-to-face collaboration. (Yahoo?)
But plenty of design, writing, computer programming and form-shuffling positions don't require many hours in an office. And very competent employees can often do their real work in four hours. They sit around another four because ... it's an eight-hour job.
So they spend afternoons bored at their desks playing video games or tooling around the Internet. They waste their time while providing no additional benefit for the employer.
If compensation were based on fulfilling the job requirements and included nothing else — not health benefits, not retirement plans — corporate bureaucracies wouldn't fret so much over time spent at the work station. People could labor for as long as they were productive, and companies would be less afraid to have two people filling one position. After all, it would cost them the same.
Old-fashioned defined-benefit pension plans are going away, replaced by arrangements in which employees save up for their own retirement. Thus, retiree benefits are playing less of a role in calculating compensation.
That leaves employer-based health coverage. It makes no more sense for companies to provide health coverage than it does for them to drop bags of groceries on each desk at the end of the day. But this is the system we're stuck with for now. Clearly, it's cheaper to insure one worker putting in eight hours than two, each doing four hours.
Obamacare does help workers wanting to start their own business or take part-time positions by ensuring affordable coverage through state health insurance exchanges. Too bad, though, that the health care reforms didn't just expand Medicare to everyone, paying for it with taxes.
That would have taken the burden of insuring workers off employers' backs. And bosses would more readily negotiate hours with their workers. Perhaps that will happen. Someday.
(A member of the Providence Journal editorial board, Froma Harrop writes a nationally syndicated column from that city. She has written for such diverse publications as The New York Times, Harper's Bazaar and Institutional Investor.)

Last Updated on Wednesday, 31 December 1969 07:00

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Roy Sanborn - June Lakes Region Waterfront Sales Report

In the month of June there were 10 sales on Lake Winnipesaukee at an average price of $1,364,018. Last June we had a whopping 17 sales, although at a lower average price of $940,500. There were four sales last month over $1 million and two exceeded the $3 million mark. For the first six months of 2012 there have been a total of 45 waterfront sales at an average of $998,618 producing a total sales volume of $44.5 million. That compares to 63 sales for the first half of 2012 at an average of $909,625 and 41 sales in 2011 at an average of $1.17 million. So while sales on the big lake are down at least some high dollar properties are moving with 13 of the 45 sales this year over the $1 million mark.
The least expensive property that sold last month on Winnipesaukee was at 133 Powers Road in Meredith. This is a year round, 1956 vintage cottage that has 2,080-square-feet of space, three bedrooms, two full baths, a classic knotty pine interior, beamed ceilings, screened porch, and a two car garage. It sits on a total of 3.8 acres that includes a separate waterfront lot with 25-feet of frontage with a sandy bottom and a 55-foot permanent dock that will hold four boats. I suspect that someone immediately saw the value in this property because it took only 24 days to find a buyer. It was offered at $519,000 and sold for $436,055 after some negotiating. The property is assessed for $460,000. I'm kind of expecting you might see some new construction here...
About mid-way up the pricing spectrum is a property at 110 Minge Cove in Alton that also has a new owner. This contemporary home was built in 1978 and has 3,074-square-feet of living space, three (plus) bedrooms, including the first floor master, three baths, and an open concept living/dining/eat-in kitchen area with views of the quiet cove. There is a screened porch and decks for summer entertaining. The .64-acre lot has 100-feet of frontage and deepwater docking. Attached and detached one car garages provide plenty of storage for the toys. This property was originally offered at $899,000 in April of 2009 and has been on the market every year since...actually for a total of 869 days. Makes me tired just thinking about it! This year it came on the market at $675,900 and sold for $650,000 which was just under the assessed value of $663,700.
The largest sale honors go to a spectacular property on Roberts Road in Alton which undoubtedly was purchased for the land rather than the structures. The property consists of seven cottages built in the thirties on an 11.3-acre lot with 615-feet of frontage, two beautiful sugar sand beaches, and long range sunset views. This is a perfect setting for a family compound or private estate. The property was listed at $4.2 million and sold for $3.057 million after 315 days on the market. It is assessed for $3.426 million.
There was only one sale on Winnisquam in June bringing the total to just five so far this year compared to seven for the first half of 2012. There are some happy new homeowners at 47 Dutile Shore Road in Belmont just in time for the summer season. This home is a very high quality 3,162-square-foot contemporary with five bedrooms and three and a half baths. It has a fabulous great room with stone fireplace, cathedral ceilings, and a wall of windows that frames the lake view. Cherry floors extend into a bright, well appointed kitchen featuring beautiful cabinetry, granite countertops, a breakfast island, and gas stove. The second floor master suite has its own private porch overlooking the water and there is a large family room in the lower level walkout. The home sits on a .22-acre lot which is beautifully landscaped and has 75-feet of frontage, a 30-foot dock, and a gentle sandy entry for the young ones. This property was originally listed at $699,000, was reduced to $674,000, and sold for $625,000 after 303 days on the market.
There were no sales on Squam Lake in June, but there is bound to be more activity on this and all the other lakes as the summer season progresses! After all, there are a lot of people out there that dream of having their own piece of our Lakes Region paradise...
Please feel free to visit www.lakesregionhome.com to learn more about the Lakes Region real estate market and comment on this article and others. Data was compiled using the Northern New England Real Estate MLS System as of 7/10/13. Roy Sanborn is a REALTOR® at Four Seasons Sotheby's International Realty and can be reached at 603-455-0335.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 31 December 1969 07:00

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Jeanie Forrester - Prudent to study Medicare Expansion issue carefully

Last year the Supreme Court ruled that the federal Affordable Care Act (ACA) could not mandate that states expand their Medicaid programs. Should New Hampshire expand its Medicaid program? The answer to this question will be a major policy decision for lawmakers.
To answer this question, lawmakers created the Medicaid Expansion Study Commission which will spend the next 3 1/2 months studying this issue. It is instructive to note that in at least three situations where Medicaid was expanded in New Hampshire in the past (1989, 1992, and 1994) in each case, there was a five-month deliberative process (SB-195, SB-319, SB-774 respectively). This commission will begin meeting in early July and make a report of findings and recommendations for proposed legislation on or before October 15, 2013.
So what is Medicaid and how does it work?
Medicaid (Title XIX of the Social Security Act) is a state and federal entitlement program that pays for medical assistance for certain individuals and families with low incomes. This program became law in 1965 as a cooperative venture jointly funded by federal and state governments to assist states in providing medical assistance to eligible needy persons. Medicaid is the largest source of funding for medical and health-related services for America's poorest people.
Medicaid is very comprehensive with little to no cost to the beneficiary for services.  Coverage is similar to private insurance with much less exposure to the beneficiary.  There are a number of providers who do not accept Medicaid so choices are more limited. According to staff at the N.H. Department of Health & Human Services (NHDHHS), a completed Medicaid application takes 30 days to be processed and individuals receive an ID card within 7-10 business days. The ID card can be used like an insurance card with very few limitations. There are no limits on primary care, hospitals, or the number of emergency room visits. Coverage is effective immediately and allows for a 90-day retroactive period where claimants can submit bills to be paid.
In New Hampshire, Medicaid is the state's largest and most expensive program, costing $1.4 billion a year and accounting for 27 percent of general fund spending. (According to the latest annual report —2008 — listed on the NHDHHS website, more than 147,000 citizens received Medicaid.) It is estimated that approximately 58,000 additional New Hampshire citizens will benefit if we accept the $2.5 billion in federal funds to expand Medicaid.
The bipartisan commission proposed by the Senate Finance Committee and signed into law by Governor Hassanwill have the time and resources necessary to study what expansion will mean for the state. Some issues to consider:
Over the next seven years, expanded Medicaid could have a net cost to N.H. taxpayers of up to $200 million. (Once the federal match drops to 90 percent after three years, state costs will be upwards of $50 million annually.) How will taxpayers fund this $50 million expenditure?
Using the federal funding estimates put forward by expansion proponents, it appears that federal and state government will be spending nearly $15,000 per new enrollee under expansion. At this cost, new enrollees would be on health insurance plans classified as "Cadillac" by the ACA — plans that are now subject to increased taxes. Will the new enrollees be able to pay the increased taxes or will someone else be responsible?
Given the state's already low Medicaid reimbursement rates, some providers have stopped accepting new Medicaid patients. Providers have been unable to guarantee they would have the ability to take on the thousands of new patients expected to seek care under the expanded program. Will there be enough providers to offer health care services with this new population?
According to the New Hampshire Center for Public Policy Studies, with the increase of Medicaid coverage up to 138 percent of poverty*, 34,000 people with existing private insurance will now become eligible for Medicaid. Will they drop their private insurance to go onto Medicaid?
A recent paper by the New Hampshire Center for Public Policy Studies proposes several expansion models to cover various segments of New Hampshire's uninsured population — each of which would have different costs and implications. To date, none of these additional options have been explored; despite the study showing that the one-size-fits-all proposal offered by the Governor is not the most cost effective for the state. Shouldn't these options be reviewed?
On issues of both cost and effectiveness, it is not clear that the one-size-fits-all Medicaid Expansion is the right path for New Hampshire taxpayers, patients or providers. It would seem only prudent that this commission hear from the experts, study this issue carefully, learn about the pros and cons of this entitlement, and assure that we have a plan that will be successful for our state.
As always, I want to hear from you. If you have a concern you'd like to share, an event you'd like me to attend, or a problem you think I might be able to help with — please call or email (271-2609 [o] or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ). If you would like to subscribe to my e-newsletter, visit HYPERLINK "http://www.jeanieforrester.com"www.jeanieforrester.com and sign up.
(*2013 Poverty Guidelines: 100 percent poverty for a family of four is $23,550; 138 percent of poverty for a family of four is $32,499; Source: http://www.medicaid.gov/Medicaid-CHIP-Program-Information/By-Topics/Eligibility/Downloads/2013-Federal-Poverty-level-charts.pdf)
(Republican Jeanie Forrester of Meredith represents District 2 in the New Hampshire State Senate.)

Last Updated on Friday, 12 July 2013 07:49

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Michelle Malkin - Some women have fetish for sociopaths

I would like to declare a war on women — namely, all those cringe-inducing ninnies who lust after every celebrity criminal defendant with big muscles, tattoos, puppy-dog eyes or Hollywood hair.
You know who I'm talking about, right? America's Bad Boy groupies. They're on the courthouse steps with their "Free Jahar" signs, cooing over how "hot" and "cute" the bloodstained Boston Marathon bombing suspect is. He "can blow me up with babies," one moral reprobate quipped shortly after his capture. "I'm not gonna lie, the second bombing suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, is hot. #sorrynotsorry," another young girl boasted.
Among the callous accused killer's victims, in case you'd forgotten: 8-year-old boy Martin Richard, who had been cheering on his dad and other family friends at the race. But who cares about an innocent dead child blown to bits by pressure cooker bombs in the name of Allah?
Far from a minuscule fringe, the Ja-harem is a growing social media phenomenon. Its members mimic Justin Bieber's Beliebers, adopting the last name of their Tiger Beat terrorist and doodling hearts around his mug shot. In heat or in jest, these depraved females continue to spread viral photos, memes and hashtags of their Islamist Idol. One woman showed up at Tsarnaev's court appearance Wednesday donning a "Free the Lion" T-shirt. Another sported a "Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is innocent" tee, while her gal pal shouted, "Exonerate!"
For those ladies who prefer jocks to jihadis, there's accused murderer/NFL star Aaron Hernandez. He's "fine as wine," one woman lusted. He's "too damned sexy to go to prison," another lamented. "He can come to jail at my house," sighed yet another. In response to one of gangsta Hernandez's Glock-wielding Instagram pics, one sick chick slavered, "Soooo hot with the combination handgun-mirror selfie."
Fugitive cop-killer Christopher Dorner also had his own fan club. Parked in front of their TV sets, women cheered on the "kinda sexy" homicidal maniac as he terrorized Southern California before perishing in a cabin inferno. "I'd honestly hide Dorner in my house," one fan girl enthused. Tens of thousands "liked" Dorner's various support pages on Facebook.
Harmless Internet chitter-chatter? Don't kid yourselves. While some of the murderers' panting minions may be joking, it's irresponsible women like these who end up enabling, marrying and conspiring with public menaces.
They're your neighbors and relatives, suburban gals like Colleen "Jihad Jane" LaRose and Jamie "Jihad Jamie" Paulin-Ramirez of Colorado, who agreed to wed Muslim terrorists and conspired to kill Swedish cartoonist Lars Vilks. Paulin-Ramirez dragged her 6-year-old (whom she renamed "Walid") to Ireland to assist with the plot. Family members said she was "easily influenced" and that "any man that came along ... she kind of followed like a lost puppy."
It would be one thing if these morally stunted followers segregated themselves in enclaves outside the American mainstream. But some of these damaged goods end up on juries, entrusted to weigh evidence fairly, digest complex instructions, and render impartial verdicts in matters of life and death. Indeed, they are aggressively sought after by predatory defense lawyers. I'll never forget the female jurors of the first murder trial of confessed parent-killers Lyle and Erik Menendez. Star-struck by "glamorous" defense lawyer Jill Abramson, the women of the Menendez jury told Los Angeles reporters that "they admired her wardrobe and biting wit."
Their swooning for the hunky Menendez brothers, whom they praised as "bright" and "nice," was obscene. After a mistrial was declared, Abramson arranged for "her jurors" to meet the boys. Soon after, talk show queen Sally Jesse Raphael hosted a program on "women who would leave their husbands to marry a Menendez."
From Menendez mania to Free Jahar, the pathologies persist: Easily led. Emotion-driven. Desperate for male approbation. Prone to acting with their lady parts instead of their lady smarts. Heckuva job, feminism! All the equalization and parity in education and the workplace are for naught if women can't distinguish right from wrong and "hot" from evil.
Lesson learned: You can indoctrinate generations of American women in the ways of gender empowerment, but you can't make a goodly portion of them think straight. Hormones trump basic human decency and good judgment in the crowded coven of sociopaths.
(Syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin is the daughter of Filipino Immigrants. She was born in Philadelphia, raised in southern New Jersey and now lives with her husband and daughter in Colorado. Her weekly column is carried by more than 100 newspapers.)

Last Updated on Friday, 12 July 2013 07:44

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