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Bob Meade - Stop. . .

. . . always trying to blame the other guy. Be responsible for your own actions or inactions.

. . . acting like a trash-talking athlete who is always trying to "dis" (disrespect) his opponent. It almost always comes back at you, showing you as being immature or petty.

. . . talking . . . you're overexposed. Paraphrasing writer Peggy Noonan, there comes a time when people get tired of all the words and just tune you out.

. . . making every issue a "political" one . . . try putting country before party and see how much more respect the people will have for you.

. . . demonizing businesses. Recognize that virtually every cent of tax revenues paid to federal, state, and local governments had its origin in some business enterprise.

. . . talking about "waste, fraud, and abuse" and do something about it.

— when the country was shown pictures and videos of Federal employees in lavish hotel surroundings, in hot tubs with their glasses of champagne, or being taught how to dance, were any actions taken to ensure that type of excess would not be tolerated? And, by the way, has that excessive amount of money spent on "partying" been removed from those departments' subsequent budgets?

—  when departments such as Energy and Education have failed for years to meet the objectives for which they were created, why is the answer to always reward that failure with more funding . . . why aren't they closed as any failed business would be?

. .  . protecting the guilty. When appropriate suspend them without pay or fire them.

. . .  giving those who violated the law and abused their offices "paid vacations" as "punishment" is a dereliction of duty and clearly falls into the category of "waste, fraud, and abuse".

. . . telling the public that those who have violated their public trust have "lost their positions", only to find out later that they lost nothing, they were simply transferred to another position, is a compounding of the violation of the public trust by even higher level individuals.

. . . stonewalling. The Congress is charged with oversight responsibility and it is their duty to investigate and get answers pertaining to actions such as the Benghazi attack, the IRS abuses of power, the Justice Department failure to fulfill its constitutional responsibility to enforce duly enacted laws, the Justice Department not providing truthful testimony to Congress concerning wire tapping of a reporter, his family, and his fellow employees.

. . . attacking the Separation of Powers. Ff you don't like a Supreme Court ruling you can seek to have a law written that will accomplish what you think is necessary and will satisfy the court that it meets its constitutional requirements.

— Publicly "dis"ing the Supreme Court is abhorrent behavior on the part of the Executive Branch. It is the responsibility of the Executive, through its Justice Department, to ensure that the rulings of the court are enforced, not ignored or challenged.

— Publicly "dis"ing the Congress and continually stating that you intend to by-pass its authority if you don't get your way. Such action is not only petty and petulant, it's dictatorial threats diminish the highest office in the land.

. . . challenging constitutional limits of Executive Branch power . . . making "recess appointments" as a thumb in the eye to the power of Congress to make its own rules.

— While this Executive Branch's action was overturned by the courts, during President Andrew Johnson's term of office, a similar act by him was cause for writing Article 3 of his Impeachment.

—  Executive Branch arbitrarily changing implementation dates called for in the Affordable Care Act is an example of the Executive taking dictatorial actions. Again, it is the responsibility of the Justice Department to see that all laws are faithfully executed. In this case it appears the Justice Department simply chooses to ignore Executive Branch changes to the law, and it fails to meet its own constitutional responsibility.

. . . turning "regulations" into "laws" that defy comprehension or understanding.

— The Affordable Care Act is 2,409 pages long and there are an additional 19,000 plus pages of regulations already written. It is expected that it will take a total of 10 years to write all of the regulations.

— There is an old saying that "Ignorance of the law is no excuse." How is it that we have let the federal government so over-power people and businesses with words of legalese that no normal business will have the ability to reasonably understand what is expected of them.

— The sheer volume of laws and regulations will require countless more people to be added to the already bloated Federal bureaucracy, just to administer them.

. . . violating the First Amendment right to Freedom of Religion . . . by using edicts, regulations, and Executive Branch interpretations to restrict religious institutions and individuals by confining that freedom to only within the walls of their church, synagogue, or mosque.

— Because of those demands, religious, heretofore untaxed, institutions will now be taxed, essentially paying for those things which are contrary to their beliefs.

Please . . . stop it!

(Bob Meade is a Laconia resident.)

 
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