Belknap County indictments

The following people were indicted on Dec. 3 by a Belknap County grand jury:

• Christian St. Cyr, 33, of 76 County Drive Laconia was indicted for two counts of forgery and once count of being a felon in possession of a weapon while in Laconia.

• David Simonds, 49, of 46 Winnisquam Ave. Laconia was indicted for one count of being a registered sex offender and failing to register a new address within five days.

• Kayla Miner, 35, of 177 Gold St. Laconia was indicted for one count of sales of heroin while in Laconia.

• Ryan Ronn Hillsgrove, 37, of 18 Main St. in New Durham was indicted for one count of being a felon in possession of a dangerous weapon, one count of possession of methadone and two counts of possession of methamphetamine while in Laconia

• Robert Hunter, 21, formerly of 20 Jewett St. Laconia was indicted for one count of possession of methylphenidate and one count of falsifying evidence while in Laconia.

• Tarra Bruno, 29, of 58 Girard St. in Laconia was indicted for one count of possession of a controlled drug methamphetamine while in Laconia.

• William Brown V, 32, of 123 Merrimac St. in Laconia was indicted for one count of sales of heroin, ne count of sales of heroin/fentanyl and one count of endangering the welfare of a child, one count of possession of Clonazepan, and one count of possession of heroin/fentanyl in Laconia.

• Angela Skinner, 27, of "homeless" Tilton was indicted for one count possession of a controlled drug heroin/fentanyl while in Tilton.

• Emmanuel Ham-Ying, of 91 Clough Road in Pittsfield was indicted for two counts of felonious sexual assault, one count of aggravated felonious sexual assault, one count of aggravated felonious sexual assault – pattern, and one count of attempted burglary while in Belmont.

• Carl Smart, 37, of 65 Gilford Ave. in Laconia was indicted for four counts of aggravated felonious sexual assault while in Laconia.

• James York, 32, of 11 Jewett St. Apt. E. in Laconia was indicted for one count of operating after being deemed an habitual offender while in Laconia.

• Kevin Gobeil, 21, of 322 Union Ave. #2 was indicted for one class A felony count of burglary while in Laconia.

• Michael Regan, 32, of 46 Arch St. #1 in Laconia was indicted for one class A felony count of burglary while in Laconia.

• Raime Shaw, 35, of Cottonwood Ave. in Laconia was indicted for once count of possession of controlled drugs heroin/fentanyl.

• Keith Robertson, 42, of 27 President Road in Manchester was indicted for one count of possession of methamphetamine while in Laconia.

• Krystal O'Brien, 24, of "transient," Lincoln was indicted for one count of possession of heroin and one count of possession of marijuana in Laconia.

• John Hammond, 31, #3 of 1 Dixon St. in Laconia was indicted for two counts of theft by unauthorized taking while in Laconia.

• Edward Chambers, 37, of 246 Country Club Road in Laconia was indicted for one count of operating after being deemed an habitual offender and one count of disobeying an officer while in Laconia.

• Carrie Conway, 36, of 76 County Drive was indicted for possession of methamphetamine in Laconia.

• Ashley Cooper, 27, of 160 W. Parrish Road in Concord was indicted for possession of methamphetamine while in Laconia.

• Chad Elliot, 37, of 27 Stevens Ave. #A in Meredith was indicted for receiving stolen property with a value greater that $1,501 while in Tilton.

• Kirk Stutes, 30, of 7 View St. Norhfield was indicted for one count of receiving stolen property with a value greater that $1,501 while in Tilton.

• John Hammond, 31, of 1 Dixon St. #3 was indicted for one count of willful concealment while in Tilton.

• Jay Bernier, 49, of 23 Liscomb Circle in Gilford was indicted for two counts of aggravated felonious sexual assault while in Laconia.

• Robert Audette, 26, of 398 Elm St. in Laconia was charged with two counts of criminal threatening with a deadly weapon – a gun, one count of being a felon in possession of a fire arm while in Laconia.

• Steven Belanger, 30, of 108 Vine St. in Northfield was indicted for one count of burglary while in Meredith.

• Brittni Reynolds, of 38 Lyford St. in Laconia was indicted for possession of heroin, one count of possession of marijuana, and one count of carrying illegal weapons – brass knuckles – while in Laconia.

• Trisha Reynolds, 25, of 123 Merrimac St. was indicted for one count of fentanyl and for one count of conspiracy to commit drug sales while in Laconia.

• Eliana Fontanez, 23, of 22B Shepard St. in Laconia was indicted for one count of welfare fraud while in Laconia.

• Joseph Prescott, 32, of 202 Black Brook Road in Meredith was charged with once count of burglary.

• Arthur Liesner, 31, of Belmont, was indicted for four counts of failing to register online accounts after while being a Tier 3 sex offender and two counts of duty to inform.

• Stephen Simpson, 20, of 9 Depot St. in Alton was indicted for two counts sales of marijuana and one count of possession of marijuana with intent to distribute.

• Jennifer Mitchell, 42, whose last known address was 135 Fellows Hill Road #203 in Northfield was charged with one count of assault by prisoner-simple assault while she was incarcerated in Laconia.

• Brandon Pestana, of 76 Country Drive, was indicted for one count of assault by prisoner – simple assault, while incarcerated in Laconia.

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Gilmanton selectmen debate best ways to fund library

GILMANTON – Selectmen appeared to reverse course on the Year-Round Library Monday night when they recommended the electorate petition two separate articles onto the 2016 town ballot.

The first article would be a simple request to fund the non-for-profit library for $50,000 – which has been the way the operating expenses have been handled for the past eight to 10 years. This would take a simple majority to pass.

The second article would ask for a three-year funding contract for $50,000 a year for the next three years. According to Chairman Rachel Hatch, because it is a petitioned article, it would need only a simple majority to pass and would obligate the town for the next three years.

Hatch's initial suggestion was to put a three-year article on the warrant asking for $150,000 with $50,000 to be raised and appropriated for fiscal year 2016. This would need a three-fifths, or 60 percent, majority to pass. If it passed, it, too, would obligate the town for the next three years.

The Gilmanton Year Round Library is a not-for-profit agency that operates from a building that is not owned by the town. Many volunteers and grants helped build it, but in recent years fundraising activities have left it short on operating capital and to continue operations the library has petitioned for money from the voters through the ballot.

The nearly 40 strong assembly of people Monday were just about split as to how they want the operations of the library funded. About half of them wanted to see it petitioned on to the warrant and many of those favored doing it one year at a time only.

About half of the people wanted the town to enter into a three-year contract with the library so that, if it passed, the library board could have some sense of how much money it had to plan programming for at least two years.

This split of about 50-50 is highly representative of the vote over the past years. In 2015, the one-year funding petitioned warrant article passed by a little over 100 votes, in 2014 it passed by less than 20, and in 2013 it failed by a just a handful.

A few people, who described themselves as families who had recently relocated to Gilmanton, support town funding without any caveats and said they consider the GYRL one of the reasons they moved to Gilmanton.

Selectman Michael Jean said he favors a selectman-generated warrant article that would need a three-fifths majority to pass.

"I felt it was a greater burden for them to justify the money," he said in a phone interview yesterday.

The key question that the board still needs to know is what effect any petitioned three-year warrant article will have on future years' budgets and default budgets.

A default budget, which is what Gilmanton is operating under this year "means the amount of the same appropriations as contained in the operating budget authorized for the previous year, reduced and increased, as the case may be, by debt service, contracts, and other obligations previously incurred or mandated by law, and reduced by one-time expenditures contained in the operating budget. For the purposes of this paragraph, one-time expenditures shall be appropriations not likely to recur in the succeeding budget...as determined by the governing body," says the state law governing them.

If there is not a majority vote for the town budget article, then the town must operate under a default budget, according to the Official Ballot Act adopted by Gilmanton about four years ago.

Should a three-year article pass, be it petitioned or not, Town Administrator Paul Branscombe said he thinks it would become part of the default budget, which led Jean to express some concern about finding $50,000 in a future 2017 or 2018 operating budget.

All selectmen agreed finding $50,000 of operating money in a default budget would be very difficult.

Guarino was the board member who insisted that the warrant article be put on by petition. He said it's what he felt was right.

"Just remember, it will only take a majority vote," said Hatch.

The final date to petition anything on the town warrant is Jan. 12.

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Gilmanton hires new officer

GILMANTON — Selectmen’s Chairman Rachel Hatch swore in the town’s newest police officer, William Mahoney IV, in a brief ceremony Monday night attended by fellow officers, family and friends.
Mahoney, 19, is a lifelong resident of Gilmanton who said he had always looked up to police officers as role models.
“I like the idea of taking criminals and anything illegal out of town,” Mahoney said.
Mahoney, who begins at the first of the year as a full-time officer with Gilmanton, will graduate with an associate’s degree in criminal justice from New Hampshire Technical Institute in May. While working this spring, he said he will complete his degree by taking both online and in-class instruction.
As part of his degree program, Mahoney completed a 120-hour internship with the Gilmanton Police Department.
Mahoney will attend the New Hampshire Police Standards and Training full-time academy beginning May 5. He said he plans on pursuing his bachelor’s degree and possibly more either at Plymouth State University or Southern New Hampshire University.

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