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173-pound dog to be guest of honor at city's 5th Annual BOW WOW Fest

LACONIA — The fifth annual BOW WOW Fest on Saturday, May 2 will feature this year's most outstanding canine celebrity, The Hulk, an 18 month old American Pitbull Terrier, who weighs 173 pounds and is still growing.

Bred by Marlon and Lisa Grennan, The Hulk is likely the largest and surely the friendliest of his breed. Last month, he strolled the sidewalks of New York before making the appearance on "Good Morning America" that introduced him to audiences around the world. He will be performing in a music video with Inspectah Deck of the Wu-Tang Clan and Esoteric, two of the most celebrated hip-hop artists in the world. Recently The Hulk caught the eye of Cesar Milan, the popular dog trainer, who intends to profile the Grennans' work with pitbulls on his television program, "Cesars' Way."

When The Hulk is not courting celebrity and earning his keep, he naps, sings and plays with with the Greenans' three year old son, Jordan, who occasionally rides him about the family's estate.

The Grennans own and operate Dark Dynasty K9s on 150 acres in northern New Hampshire, breeding and training American Pitbull Terriers for sale as protectors of persons and property to clients throughout the world.

The Hulk will head the Pooch Parade at the BOW WOW Fest on the WOW Trail and pose for photographs with the many new friends and fans he will make during the day.

The BOW WOW Fest begins at Lakeport Square with registration at 8:45 a.m. followed by the blessing of the pets at 10:05 and start of the parade at 10:15 and closes with the judging and awards between 11:15 and 11:45.

Last Updated on Monday, 20 April 2015 11:22

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Coffee with a Cop: City residents have questions for chief

LACONIA — About 10 people joined Police Chief Chris Adams and Sgt. Gary Hubbard yesterday at the department's first "Coffee with a Cop" event held at My Coffee House yesterday morning.

A resident from Shore Drive started off the discussion by asking Adams some basics questions about the department — mostly about equipment.

Adams said there are 40 sworn police officers who use seven "front-line" vehicles. The department has four bicycles and three motorcycles as well as a number of older vehicles used by management and detectives.

He also said there are laptops in the front-line cruisers and officers' equipment is kept up-to-date.

Adams also fielded a question about Tasers (electric stun guns) and training in their use, likely spurred by the recent accidental sidearm shooting of a man by a Tulsa, Oklahoma reserve deputy who said he thought he was grabbing his Taser.

Hubbard demonstrated for the attendees how both weapons are secured and carried in different spots.

People had quite a few questions about property crime as it relates to drug abuse and the chief agreed that the two are interrelated in the city.

Adams also said most burglaries and thefts are crimes of "opportunity" and rarely do the police encounter people who actually have a plan.

"I know we all like to think we live in rural New Hampshire and shouldn't have to worry about locking out doors," Adams said.

Hubbard said most homes that are burglarized have open windows or doors on the first floor or there are air conditioners that can be pushed in if not secured properly.

Adams also recommended locking the doors and window of motor vehicles.

As to drug abuse, Adams said the LPD has two detectives dedicated to the drug unit and they work closely with the N.H. State Police, other area police departments and the state drug task force.

A considerable amount of discussion went into they types of drugs police seeing, other than heroin and opiates, and what the effects of them are.

Adams and Hubbard both agreed they still see a fair amount of marijuana and alcohol usage among young people but also said many of the people with heroin and opiate addictions are older.

"We've have overdoses as old as 57," said Hubbard.

Including the new addition of a Prevention, Enforcement and Treatment officer, Adams said the city has added two extra officers to the force in the past few years and he expects the City Council to fund the PET officer a permanent position.

Others wanted to know what people should do if they found needles and other drug-related items on the ground now that the snow has melted. Adams told them to notify police and not to touch them.

One lady wanted to know what a person should do if they come upon a car accident that police had not yet responded to.

Hubbard told her the best thing to do was to pull over, stay in her car and call 9-1-1 if possible. He said getting out of a car and going into traffic, especially on a highway or in the evening, can be very dangerous.

"Don't put yourself in any danger," he said, adding that drivers very often don't pay as close attention as they should to what's going on around them. "Your car is the safest place."

Adams noted that many times he has heard about well-intended people getting hit and killed on highways while they were helping someone else.

After the community meeting, Adams said he was pleased with the turnout and said there would be more sessions over the spring and summer in different venues.
He said he was also looking at bringing some other officers who perform different tasks so the community can understand what they do. He gave detectives, polygraph operators, juvenile officers, the school resource officer and the DARE officer as examples of some of the varied types of specialized training many of his staff have.

Last Updated on Monday, 20 April 2015 11:13

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Belknap County Grand Jury returns 31 indictments

BELKNAP COUNTY — The following indictment were returned by a Belknap County Superior Court grand jury earlier this month.

Shauna Landry, 39 of Manchester was indicted for one count of being an accomplice to burglary after an investigation by the Tilton Police.

Monica Kemper, 31, of Laconia was indicted for one count of possession of methamphetamine.

Gary Sitka, 51, of Union Avenue was indicted for two counts of being a registered sex offender and failing to report to police his new address.

Heath Wilkins, 33, of Concord was indicted for one count of burglary and five counts of theft by unauthorized taking — firearms after an investigation by Gilmanton Police.

Joseph Coutu, 20, of Belmont was indicted for two counts of second degree assault — domestic violence, one count of witness tampering, and five counts of simple assault – domestic violence after an investigation by Laconia Police.

Thomas T. Chambers, of Belmont was indicted for one count of possession of methamphetamine and one count of possession of of a controlled drug and one count of possession of Buprenorphine.

Steven E. Moore, 33, of Groton was indicted for possession of heroin after an investigation by the Laconia Police.

Brian Moore, 35, of Plymouth was indicted for one count of robbery and one count of witness tampering after an investigation by the Laconia Police.

Nicholas Moore, 32, of Groton was indicted for one count of possession of heroin after and investigation by Laconia Police.

Benjamin Geddis, of Sanbornton was indicted by one count of operating a motor vehicle after being deemed an habitual offender after an investigation by Gilford Police.

Robert J. Saulinier, 42 of Alton was indicted for one count of possession of heroin and one count of possession of oxycodone with the intent to distribute it after an investigation by Belmont Police.

Leeann Duhamel, 28, of Laconia was indicted for possession of fentanyl after an investigation by Gilford Police.

Michael Grenier, 34, of Laconia was indicted for possession of heroin with the intent to distribute it.

Joshua Fox, 34, of Gilford was indicted for one count of possession of fentanyl.

Eric V Lanigan, 32, of Laconia was indicted for one count of possession of oxycodone and heroin.

Ashley Dupont, 33, of Laconia was indicted for one count of welfare fraud for failing to disclose that a man was a member of her household, meaning she didn't qualify for food stamps.

Michael Dupuis, 57, of Laconia was indicted for one count of simple assault for having unprivileged contact with a corrections officer after an investigation by the Belknap County Sheriff's Department.

Shawn Cochrane, 45, of Meredith was indicted for two counts of theft by deception and three counts of issuing bad checks after an investigation by Belmont Police.

Lee J. Shimeld, 38, of Northwood was indicted for one count of attempted burglary and one count of possession of burglary tools after an investigation by Tilton Police.

Skyler Farquharson, 22, of Laconia was indicted for one count of conspiracy to commit robbery and one count of accomplice to robbery.

Shauna Landry, 39, of Manchester was indicted for one count of accomplice to burglary after an investigation by Tilton Police.

Rabert F. Celata, 25, of Northfield was indicted for one count of conspiracy to commit possession of a controlled drug following an investigation by Belmont Police.

Jarod C. Leroux, of Laconia was indicted for one count of sale of methamphetamine.

Jeromy A. Woodey, 32, of Laconia was indicted for one count of burglary in the night time after an investigation by Gilmanton Police.

Ruben Rivera Sanchez, 42, of Laconia was indicted for one count of assault by prisoner after an investigation by the Belknap County Sheriff's Department.

Jack H. Lynch, 22, of Holderness was indicted for one count of possession of heroin after an investigation by Laconia Police.

Joshua J. Deboer, 30 of Laconia was indicted on one count of second degree assault, one count of simple assault — domestic violence, one count of obstructing the reporting of a crime- domestic violence and one count of endangering the welfare of a child.

Sean Andrus, 27, of Tilton was indicted for two counts of forgery.

Zachary Fry, 25, of Northfield was indicted for two counts of sale of a represented controlled drug after an investigation by Tilton Police.

Raime Shaw, 35, of Wolfeboro was indicted for one count of theft by unauthorized taking after an investigation by Tilton Police.

Jacob Sargent, 32, of New Hampton was indicted for one count of witness tampering, one count of simple assault-domestic violence and one count of simple assault.

Last Updated on Saturday, 18 April 2015 12:38

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Shakerto host 2-day education vision forum in June

BELMONT — The Shaker Regional School District is hosting a well-known education author and consultant to facilitate a two-day community event to work with members of the community, staff and students to form a vision for the future of the district.

Bea McGarvey is a retired educator from Maine who spent 30 years teaching and administrating school districts and is a trained facilitator in education management and administration. She is the co-author of "Inevitable: Mass Customizing Learning", which addresses outdated practices in education and how to address them using the latest technology to customize learning for the individual student.

The event is two days and is on June 19 and June 20.

Business leaders, parents, teachers and residents of Belmont and Canterbury who are interested in learning more should go to www.SAU80.org for more information and complete a brief informational form.

For more information please call 267-9223 ext. 5300.

Additionally, the Shaker School Board is having a special meeting on April 23 at 6 p.m. in the cafeteria of the Canterbury Elementary School to review and discuss requests for quote for an outside agency to conduct a "culture" survey for the Shaker District.

The culture survey stems from statements made at annual town meeting by some residents and parents who said they were dissatisfied with the existing culture and administration of the district.

Last Updated on Friday, 17 April 2015 11:53

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