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Motorcycle Week vending fees opposed in Meredith

MEREDITH — The Board of Selectmen this week tabled a proposal to levy a fee on vendors during Laconia Motorcycle Week when it met with resistance from Laconia Harley-Davidson, Hart's Turkey Farm restaurant and the American Police Motorcycle Museum, the major hosts to vendors during the rally. The earliest fees could now be introduced in the town would be 2017.

Following the precedent of Laconia, the ordinance would require all transient vendors, other than non-profit organizations soliciting donations toward a charitable purpose, to be licensed by the town at a fee of $450, which would entitle them to operate from noon on the first Friday until midnight on the last Sunday of the rally. Vendors operating without a license would be liable to a fine of failure to obtain a license would carry a fine of up to $500 for each day of unlawful operation.

Town Manager Phil Warren told the board that this year the town incurred expenses of $18,017 during the event, which consisted of $7,149 for police overtime, $5,868 for fire service and $5,000 in dues for the town's membership in the Laconia Motorcycle Week Association (LMWA). Revenues amounted to $660, which represented special use permits issued to Laconia Harley-Davidson and Hart's Turkey Farm Restaurant at $330 apiece. The license fees, he said, were intended to offset the cost to the town of providing police and safety services for the event.

Anne Deli, president of Laconia Harley-Davidson, warned that if the town levied a vendor fee "we will lose vendors" and asked "does Meredith really want to put one more nail in the coffin of Motorcycle Week."

She explained that the dealership doubles its payroll to 150 during the rally, stressing that all but 30 of the employees are residents of the Lakes Region.  Deli said that since she and her husband acquired the business in 2008, it has contributed more than $225,000 to local and regional charities.The dealership, she said, paid for hotel rooms in Meredith and a per diem food allowance for those 30 employees. In addition, Deli said that the company invests about $220,000 a year providing the infrastructure and marketing for Motorcycle Week, but collects $145,000 in rents from vendors. She said that vendor fees have not been increased because "vendors would go elsewhere," adding there are many competitors for vendors "ready to pounce on us".

Deli said that if vendors fees sapped income from the dealership, the costs would have to be upset by reducing employment, charitable contributions or marketing expenses, all of which would adversely impact the rally itself.

Doug Frederick of the museum said that he offers space without charge to non-profit organizations and veterans' groups. He said that they are welcome to make donations to the museum, but rent — let alone a $450 licensing fee — would be a significant burden to small operators. He noted that their presence at the site is not intended as a source of income but as an added attraction that draws visitors to the museum.

 

Last Updated on Thursday, 20 August 2015 12:17

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Pilot 'community corrections' program approved

LACONIA — Belknap County Commissioners have approved a pilot program for a comprehensive substance abuse/behavioral health assessment and treatment and offender case management program as a first step towards a planned "community corrections" center.
The program was developed by a committee of county agency representatives working with consultant Kevin Warwick, whose firm was hired to develop programs for a community corrections facility for the county, and calls contracting with a private community-based treatment contractor at a proposed cost of $46,564 for six months of services provided by equivalent of 1.5 full-time workers.
Commissioners said yesterday that they are looking at paying for the program through the use of some of the $400,000 remaining in the jail planning fund in the Department of Corrections budget.
The program, as outlined by Warwick and Jacqui Abikoff, Horizons Counseling Center executive director, would provide early intervention and screening assessments which would classify and target offenders appropriately and identify low risk offenders, who could be considered for alternative programs and move out of the jail, as well as high risk offenders, who would be targeted for intensive treatment services at the jail.
Warwick said that currently the assessments are not done early enough in the process to help provide information to the courts resulting in decisions on treatment being made by judges rather than clinicians.
He said that currently 70 percent of those incarcerated at the Belknap County Jail have been there previously and unless intensive treatment is provided they will be back.
''Many have serious substance abuse problems and only get two hours of treatment a week. In many cases they need at least 200 to 300 hours of service over a nine-month period,'' said Warwick.
He said that Sullivan County, where he served as a consultant for their community corrections facility, has experienced a decrease in repeat offenders from 65 percent to 18 percent, resulting in substantial savings to the cost of housing prisoners.
The plan calls for a three track system to identify the treatment and transitional needs of offenders, an intensive treatment program for those serving a minimum of 90 days who have been identified as high risk, which would see 12-15 hours a week of treatment; a second track for short-term offenders identified as low risk and a third track for pre-trial inmates.
Abikoff said it is important to realize that addiction is a disease and not a behavior and said that she does not initially see any large increase in the numbers served over the 10 or so which currently take part in the Recovery Court program, which she said has already resulted in savings of about $350,000 over three years even though the program has received no county funding.
Warwick said that initially there might be a 10 percent reduction in recidivism, which could increase in a few years to a 30 percent reduction.
Warwick said that another New Hampshire county which 56 people in its drug (recovery) court program has realized a savings of $1 million a year in jail costs.
Members of the committee which came up with the pilot program included Acting Corrections Superintendent Keith Gray, Belknap County Attorney Melissa Guldbrandsen, Public Defender Jesse Friedman, Restorative Justice Director Brian Loanes, Sheriff Craig Wiggin, Department of Corrections Program Director Tamara McGonagle, and Abikoff.
Guldbrandsen, who could not be present for yesterday's meeting, sent a memo to the commission expressing her support for the pilot program in which she said ''the financial benefits of supporting this program should be clear to the county.''
The Belknap County Jail Planning Committee, which is headed by Commission Chairman Dave DeVoy (R-Sanbornton), is working on a proposal for a 64-bed community corrections facility which is estimated to cost $7 million.
Warwick recently told the committee that the cost of staffing the new facility with six new employees is estimated to add $454,193 in first year costs to the current Belknap County Corrections Department budget. That number doesn't include program provider costs.
DeVoy says he he is hopeful that grant funding will be available for the program provider positions, which are estimated at $60,000 a year per provider, which would add $240,000 a year to staffing costs, pushing the total increase in staffing costs to around $700,000.

Last Updated on Thursday, 20 August 2015 12:11

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The other woman running for president: Carly Fiorina campaigns in Laconia

LACONIA — Speaking to a packed house at the Belknap Mill last evening, Republican presidential hopeful Carly Fiorina closed by riffing on two national icons — both women standing tall — she called "Lady Liberty and Lady Justice." The first resolutely facing the world as a beacon of hope and the second bearing the sword of a warrior and the scale of a judge.

Both images inform Fiorina's campaign as both a candidate and a woman. She began as a secretary in small real estate agency and became chief executive officer message of the largest technology company in the world, a career she said, "is only possible in this nation." She explained that the country was founded on the "radical idea" that everyone has potential "to live a life of dignity, purpose and meaning" and it is role of leaders "to unlock the potential of others."

Noting that polling data indicates that nearly half of Americans believe the federal government is corrupt and eight of 10 believe the country is ruled by a professional political class, Fiorna claimed that weight of government bureaucracy and the political class is crushing individual initiative. "That's why I'm running for president," she said.

"Leaders challenge the status quo," Fiorina said. "That's what leaders do." She said that "we don't lack for good ideas" for securing the border, simplifying the tax code, lifting regulatory burdens, or balancing the budget, but nothing has been done for years. "The answer is always we need more money," she said, adding "it's called ineptitude and corruption. We have got to challenge the status quo."

Fiorina said that she would reduce federal spending by introducing "zero based budgeting," requiring every agency to justify every dollar spent. She said that the government spends the money of its citizens, who are entitled to know how it is spent.

The Environmental Protection Agency, she claimed, is "in the process of destroying industry after industry" and "has to be reined in," beginning with rescinding every regulation adopted during the Obama Administrations. 

She spoke of "building the strongest military in the world," particularly by sharpening "the tip of the spear" — the combat forces that project American power. The world, Fiorina said, wants and needs "American leadership" and she would assure both allies and enemies that "America is back in the leadership business."

Fiorina echoed another woman, Margaret Thatcher, who as prime minister of Great Britain declared "I will not manage the decline of a great nation," then  in her own words added "I will lead the resurgence of this great nation."

Last Updated on Thursday, 20 August 2015 01:07

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Zoning board endorses changes to city's demolition ordinance as it pertains to historic structures

LACONIA — The Zoning Board of Adjustment this week endorsed amendments to the demolition ordinance drafted and recommended by the Heritage Commission and unanimously agreed to refer the proposed to the City Council for its approval.

Pam Clark, who has chaired the Heritage Commission since it was established nine years ago, described the ordinance as a "demolition delay" ordinance, adding that it is modeled on similar regulations in other municipalities, both in New Hampshire and other states. Enacted in 2005, the ordinance is intended to protect and preserve historic buildings slated for demolition by providing time to explore alternatives and, if demolition proceeds, to document the structure and preserve any salvageable remains.
The amendment, which has been more than a year in the drafting, would apply the ordinance to a greater number of properties than hte current law and provide more time to explore alternatives to demolition. The ordinance applies to buildings at least 50 years old and demolition of more than 700-square-feet of floor area, which in the judgment of the code enforcement officer qualify as "significant buildings".
To qualify as "significant" a building must satisfy at least one of the four following criteria. First, it must possess features and qualities that would qualify it as "a historical, cultural or architectural landmark" by national or state standards. Second,it must be constructed to an uncommon design or with unusual materials that could only be reproduced with great difficulty and at great expense would also qualify. Third, buildings of such architectural value or historic importance that their demolition would adversely impact the public interest would qualify. And finally the preservation of the building must contribute to protecting and preserving a place or area of historic interest.
The remainder of the ordinance prescribes the process triggered when an application is made to demolish a building. First, the code enforcement officer shall determine if the building qualifies as "significant". If it qualifies, the applicant must be informed within five business days that the application for a demolition permit must be reviewed by the Heritage Commission at its next regularly scheduled meeting before the building can be razed.
If the commission determines the building to be demolished is not significant, the applicant shall be informed and the demolition may proceed. On the other hand, if the commission determines the building is "significant" it shall schedule a public hearing at its next monthly meeting, of which the applicant will be informed within two business days. In addition the date, time and place of the hearing will be noticed by signage on the building and in the local newspaper.
If an alternative to demolition cannot be agreed at the public hearing, the commission and applicant shall meet within 10 days. If still no agreement about the future of the building can be reached, the commission may petition the City Council to defer issuance of the demolition permit for another 60 days to allow time to pursue alternatives, including acquisition or relocation of the building.

Clark told the ZBA that initially the commission sought to petition for a delay of 180 days, but found there was no precedent for such an extended period in New Hampshire.

When all options have been exhausted, the owner of the property may proceed with demolition.

With the consent of the owner the commission shall photograph the building and encourage salvage of its significant features.
Clark said that the commission had been asked to consider allowing a property owner to request that a building be exempt from the ordinance, but rejected the notion. She noted that properties are not exempt from other requirements of the zoning ordinance or building code.
Planning Director Shanna Saunders explained that although an intern has compiled of survey of older buildings, it does not represent a registry and bears no relation to the demolition ordinance. The application of the ordinance, she stressed, would be triggered only by applications for demolition permits. Clark said that the commission had reviewed only two properties — the Putnam house and Hathaway house — during her tenure.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 19 August 2015 12:35

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