Man who was boyfriend of assistant attorney general found not guilty of 6 assault charges

  • Published in Local News

LACONIA — After five days of testimony and one day of deliberation, a Belknap County jury found a city man not guilty in six of the eight charges he faced for allegedly hitting his girlfriend — a N.H. Asst. Attorney General.

The same jury found Peter Dibiaso guilty of one felony count of witness tampering for trying to stop Lucy Carrillo from talking to Alton Police the night of the altercation and one misdemeanor count of simple assault for bruising Carrillo’s ...

LACONIA — After five days of testimony and one day of deliberation, a Belknap County jury found a city man not guilty in six of the eight charges he faced for allegedly hitting his girlfriend — a N.H. Asst. Attorney General.

The same jury found Peter Dibiaso guilty of one felony count of witness tampering for trying to stop Lucy Carrillo from talking to Alton Police the night of the altercation and one misdemeanor count of simple assault for bruising Carrillo’s arm.

The jury found him not guilty on two counts of second degree assault and four other counts of simple assault.

Dibiaso represented himself with local attorney Emily McLaughlin acting as standby. McLaughlin was the fourth “stand-by attorney” to work with Dibiaso, who had also worked with Ted Barnes, Allison Schwartz, and David Bownes.

In an interview given by Dibiaso this past summer while he was awaiting trial, he had said he felt the system was somehow prejudiced against him because his victim was a criminal lawyer with the N.H. A.G.’s Office and that was why he wanted to act as his own attorney.

Dibiaso said he and Carrillo had been involved in a nearly four-year relationship and that while he used a Laconia address as his permanent mailing address, for the most part he lived with Carrillo in her Alton home.

Dibiaso’s problems didn’t begin with his January 27 assault on Carillo, which was not reported until March of 2011.

In 2009 he was convicted of being a felon in possession of a dangerous weapon. He was sentenced to three-to-six years in prison, most of which was suspended and placed on probation for two years.

On January 27, Alton Police went to Carrillo’s house for a dropped 9-1-1 call and removed Dibiaso from the home. He was ordered not to have any contact with Carrillo, but at that point she had not reported any crime.

As the result of the dropped 9-1-1 call, Alton Police had initially charged Dibiaso with to two misdemeanors for obstructing the reporting of a crime and obstruction of government administration, but those charges were dropped.

Dibiaso allegedly violated the no-contact provisions by sending Carrillo a text message in February but he had already left the state. Carroll issued an arrest warrant and he was found by the Gulf Coast Fugitive Task Force in April of 2011. Dibiaso was returned to New Hampshire in June of 2011.

But by March of 2011, the Belknap County Sheriff Department had begun an investigation into Dibiaso’s alleged January assault and in July of 2011, he was indicted for one count of witness tampering, five counts of simple assault and two counts of second degree assault.

It was those charges he faced in this past weeks jury trial.

In an interview given by Carrillo to the Concord Monitor, her attorney said she didn’t initially speak to police about the events of January 27 because, like many other victims of domestic assault, she was embarrassed to come forward.

Found guilty of one felony and one misdemeanor, Judge James Barry ordered Dibiaso held without bail until his sentencing, which is typically three to six weeks following the conviction.

The Rockinghom County Attorney prosecuted Dibiaso because at the time of the January 2011 assault, Belknap County Attorney Melissa Guldbrandsen was the Alton town prosecutor and, once she became county attorney, she took herself off the case.