Gilford starts rebuild of Engine 4

  • Published in Local News

GILFORD — Selectmen last night voted unanimously to spend just over $11,200 to rebuild the pump on Engine 4 — the 25-year-old fire truck voters chose this month to leave in service for at least a few more years.

The pump will be fixed by Lakes Region Fire Apparatus in Tamworth and according to Fire Chief Steve Carrier the money will replace the moving parts and not the pump housing.

“This is not just your normal pump job,” said Carrier who explained to ...

GILFORD — Selectmen last night voted unanimously to spend just over $11,200 to rebuild the pump on Engine 4 — the 25-year-old fire truck voters chose this month to leave in service for at least a few more years.

The pump will be fixed by Lakes Region Fire Apparatus in Tamworth and according to Fire Chief Steve Carrier the money will replace the moving parts and not the pump housing.

“This is not just your normal pump job,” said Carrier who explained to selectmen that the transmission had to be dropped to access it.

When Selectman Kevin Hayes asked Carrier if there were any non-fire pump people who could fix the pump, Carrier recommended against it saying the town would be better off with a certified fire engine pump mechanic.

Carrier also told selectmen that the Board of Fire Engineers met and decided to take on the repairs needed to Engine 4 in a five-step manner with fixing the pump as the top priority.

The next four repairs, in order of priority, are the light bar, the electrical problems including the radio, the radiator and the tires.

Selectman John O’Brien wanted to know if the Fire Department had the money in its budget for the repairs and Carrier relied by saying the pump alone will use about 40-percent of the maintenance line.

Carrier also said the department is working to better coordinate maintenance records with the Department of Public Works. He said the statements made during the recent campaign season that the Fire Department had no maintenance records for any of the fire equipment was untrue.

“The vehicles have always been maintained,” Carrier said. “We could have done a better job consolidating our records.”

In other action, selectmen voted unanimously to sell Gilford’s long serving K-9 Agbar to his handler Sgt. Dustin Parent for $1 — a transaction typical of all law enforcement agencies when it comes time to retire one of their working animals.

Selectmen also made special note of the professionalism and many contributions Parent and Agbar made to Gilford, giving Police Chief Kevin Keenan wholehearted support to apply for a grant to a working dog society for another K-9 to be handled by Officer Adam VanSteensburg — the new K-9 in-training officer.