Electronic music festival promoter wants the music to play 'til 2 a.m.

  • Published in Local News

LACONIA — Christina Contardo, who plans to stage an electronic music festival in a field at The Weirs in August, will ask the City Council to permit the use of outdoor loudspeakers until 2 a.m. , well past the deadline of 10 p.m. set by the city ordinance, on the nights of Friday August 10 and Saturday, August 11. 

Last week Contardo approached the Licensing Board, which tabled her application pending the decision of the council. She has submitted a special events plan to ...

LACONIA — Christina Contardo, who plans to stage an electronic music festival in a field at The Weirs in August, will ask the City Council to permit the use of outdoor loudspeakers until 2 a.m. , well past the deadline of 10 p.m. set by the city ordinance, on the nights of Friday August 10 and Saturday, August 11. 

Last week Contardo approached the Licensing Board, which tabled her application pending the decision of the council. She has submitted a special events plan to the Planning Department and is scheduled to appear before the Motorcycle Technical Review Committee on April 18.

Contardo plans to hold the festival on about 6.3-acres of open ground southwest of Route 3 North, opposite Funspot, owned by Mike Foote. The venue is reached by an unpaved road off Route 3. The main stage would be set in the middle of the 325-foot by 850-foot rectangle serving as the festival grounds with a smaller covered stage just north of it.

 The event will feature deejays and producers of national and international renown "spinning" electronic tunes. Contardo said that while the largest festivals draw crowds approaching 200,000, she hopes to tempt between 4,000 and 6,000 to Laconia during the two days of the event. "We plan on treading lightly, keeping it manageable in the first year and growing into it," she said.

Contardo said that a number of neighboring businesses have indicated an interest in offering parking. Security would be provided by TNT Executive Services, LLC supplemented by police details if necessary. A pair of EMTs would be on the site throughout the event. And Contardo estimates between 50 and 75 porta-potties would  be needed, depending on the attendance.

"It will draw a slightly different demographic, roughly between 18 and 35, than other events and, because of the nature of the music, new visitors to the region. It will give a boost to the economy before people go south or indoors for the winter."

This week, The New York Times carried a front page story about electronic music festivals that began by reporting that 60,000 tickets to the Electric Daisy Festival at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey in May sold out in three hours at $100 apiece. According to the report, electronic dance music, once confined to clubs and "raves" in warehouses, is the new favorite genre of the concert industry with a growing number of festivals and profit margins appealing to Wall Street.