Long-time Alton selectman Steve McMahon has died

  • Published in Local News

ALTON — This town is mourning the death of Stephan "Steve" McMahon, who died on Friday, April 6 and was discovered at his home the next morning. McMahon had operated a bakery at the heart of Alton Bay and served 12 years as a selectman. His final term on the board ended in March after he failed to be re-elected to a fifth term.

McMahon's family is working with the Diaz-Healy Funeral Home in Lawrence, Mass., and have yet to finalize plans for ceremonies there. The Claude ...

ALTON — This town is mourning the death of Stephan "Steve" McMahon, who died on Friday, April 6 and was discovered at his home the next morning. McMahon had operated a bakery at the heart of Alton Bay and served 12 years as a selectman. His final term on the board ended in March after he failed to be re-elected to a fifth term.

McMahon's family is working with the Diaz-Healy Funeral Home in Lawrence, Mass., and have yet to finalize plans for ceremonies there. The Claude Batchelder American Legion Post #72, where McMahon was a member, is also finalizing plans to host a memorial in Alton.

"We were all surprised and saddened when we got the news," said Town Administrator Russ Bailey. "Steve always did his best to serve the citizens of Alton and be fair and consistent, right up to the time he left office."

Pat Rockwood, welfare director for the town, said McMahon "was an advocate for many people" and would tell her about residents too shy to ask for help.

"He was a helpful guy, he always cared about people and would do the best that he could to help, especially people in need," recalled Brian Mitchell.

Mitchell and his wife Linda purchased the Lakeview Market from McMahon about seven and a half years ago and changed the name to Amilyne's Corner Market. Mitchell said McMahon remained a customer of the store. "He was a very concerned townie, even though he didn't grow up here... He really did become part of the town."

McMahon's dedication to the town came despite a liver disease that he endured for a number of years. Even as his health deteriorated, McMahon continued to find ways to help. Most recently, he took in a friend whose home had burned.

Mary Doherty said McMahon was one of the first people she met when she came to town after buying the J.P. China Restaurant & Lounge, which was directly across the street from McMahon's Lakeview Market. "He was really good to my family, my kids," said Doherty. She went through a difficult divorce shortly after moving to Alton and was grateful that McMahon was able to help give her children rides to preschool without getting in the middle of the conflict. "That's where my respect for him came," she said.

"He would always look at things from all angles," added Doherty. "He was a very wise guy, and he cared about the town, the budget, and making sure everyone was being honest." When asked where McMahon's wisdom came from, Doherty answered, "life experience." "He definitely had a lot of life experience, and I think he's been judged harshly in the past. I think he took that and didn't want others to be treated that way."

Doherty recalled McMahon's love for his son, David, and his love of service to his town. "When he didn't get re-elected, it was a really hard blow for him," Doherty said.

"He is going to be missed," continued Doherty. "He was a huge asset, he did so much in his time here."