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Line dancing classes at Laconia Senior Center

LACONIA — Line dancing is now being offered on Tuesdays, from 1-2 p.m. at the beginner level, and 2-2:30 for the regular class. Both classes will be held at the Laconia Senior Center.

The first class is beginner friendly for those that have never tried line dancing. Line dancing is for all ages and no partner is needed. The music includes country, pop, Latin, hip-hop, and more. Music is deliberately slow to moderate speed to accommodate all age groups. Line dancing is an easy way to lose weight, lower blood pressure, increase balance, and build stamina. The fee is $5 per class. 

 The Laconia Senior Center is located at 17 Church Street in Laconia. For more information call G. Maloof at 536-1179 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Tom Menard, Director of the Center at 524-7689. 

Last Updated on Friday, 22 August 2014 10:43

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Conservation trust offers guided biking tours in Hill

HILL — The Lakes Region Conservation Trust in partnership with the New England Mountain Bike Association's Central NH Chapter will be holding a mountain biking excursion on Saturday, August 30 at LRCT's Page Hill and Glory Hill Conservation Areas in Hill. The trip is appropriate for experienced mountain bikers and will begin at 9:30 a.m. and end at noon. 

The Page Hill and Glory Hill Conservation Areas encompass 475 acres of scenic wooded land generously donated to LRCT. The property includes remnants of historic roads and old farmsteads and has stunning views stretching from the Belknap Mountains around to Mount Moosilauke and beyond. NEMBA has created impressive biking trails on the property, and the trip will showcase scenic views, natural forest resources, and wildlife habitats along the trails. Chris Rogers of NEMBA will guide the excursion along with experienced LRCT guides.

Preregistration is required for this event and will be limited to 15 participants. To preregister, please contact LRCT at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 603-253-3301. LRCT guided excursions are free to all.

Last Updated on Friday, 22 August 2014 10:39

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Series of workshops offered to help entrepreneurs start small businesses

PLYMOUTH — The Small Business Start Up Series program will begin at the Enterprise Center at Plymouth (ECP) on Tuesday, September 2, from 8-10 a.m. in the large conference room. This is the first in an eight-part series designed to help entrepreneurs and small business owners create sustainable businesses.

The series covers the fundamentals of establishing, operating, managing, and growing a small business with the goal of a completed business plan for those who attend most or all eight sessions. Small business owners and entrepreneurs can choose one, several, or the entire series of programs taught by professors from Plymouth State University, area professionals, and counselors from the Small Business Administration, Small Business Development Center of NH, and Lakes Region SCORE.

In the first workshop, Are You Ready for Business Ownership?, attendees will dig deep to answer questions about both their business and personal goals. Unique selling proposition, competition, and market research will be discussed as well as helpful tips on pricing products/services and funding options.

The workshops to follow will take place at the ECP on the first Tuesday of each month from 8-10 a.m. in the large conference room. Topics include Build the Foundation, Market Research, Finance Your Business, The Marketing Plan, Manage the Money (Cash is King: And Other Ways to Operate a Successful Business), How to Generate Sales, and What's the Next Step?

This first workshop is offered at no cost to attendees. For additional information, click the seminars page on the ECP's website (www.enterprisecenternh.com), call the ECP office at 535-3222, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

Last Updated on Friday, 22 August 2014 10:33

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Plymouth State University revises admissions process, SAT scores now optional

PLYMOUTH — There will be one less requirement in the application packet for students applying to Plymouth State University. The central New Hampshire university announced this week that it will no longer require applicants to submit SAT or ACT test scores beginning with students entering in Spring, 2015. Instead, Plymouth State will continue to concentrate on a student's high school record as the primary factor in offering admission.

"Standardized test scores simply don't provide much value for our counselors when determining an applicant's academic preparation" said Assistant Vice President of Enrollment Management Andrew Palumbo. While many schools still require standardized test scores in their application process, Palumbo says Plymouth State is "taking the opportunity to re-evaluate what is truly meaningful when we craft our incoming class."

Plymouth State University joins a growing movement among universities and colleges nationwide by no longer basing its admissions decisions on standardized test scores. In recent years, Plymouth State officials have looked more to high school grades, especially grades in core subject areas of English, math, science, social studies and foreign language. Still, some students find their SAT or ACT scores are a point of pride. Plymouth will continue to accept scores from applicants that choose to submit their test results. But, adds Palumbo, standardized test scores are not as accurate as an applicant's high school career in predicting success in college for most students.

Palumbo emphasized that a "test-optional" admissions process does not mean the University is lowering admissions standards. Plymouth State, he says, is more interested in actual academic performance and the rigor of an applicant's course selection than in the applicant's score on a standardized test. "Plymouth is one of a small number of schools that recalculates each applicant's high school grade point average to focus solely on the core subject areas of English, math, science, social studies and foreign language. We also give extra weight to more challenging courses." This practice, he says, rewards critical reasoning and communication skills over the "quick decision-making skills that timed standardized tests measure."

The University also considers each applicant's extracurricular involvement, an admissions essay, and an academic recommendation from a high school teacher. "Plymouth State is a special institution that offers excellent academic opportunities within an engaging residential community. We owe it to our students to leave behind older methods of evaluating applicants that are no longer relevant. We are looking for a diverse group of students who will bring far more to our community than their test scores."

Last Updated on Friday, 22 August 2014 10:28

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