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New Hampshire State Forest Nursery Accepting Orders

BOSCAWEN —  The New Hampshire State Forest Nursery continues to accept orders for bare-root tree and shrub seedlings for delivery in spring 2014.

Now in its 104th year, the nursery distributes an average of over 300,000 seedlings annually, mostly to New Hampshire landowners and residents. Originally established in 1910 to provide seedlings for reforestation, the program has expanded to include seedling sales for Christmas tree planting stock and conservation uses such as windbreaks, gravel bank reclamation, wetland plantings, native plant species and wildlife and songbird habitat. The State Forest Nursery has a reputation of producing a product of the highest quality for a reasonable price.

More than forty species of tree and shrub seedlings are available this year including 13 conifers (pine, spruce, fir), 3 hardwood trees (maple, walnut) and 25 species of deciduous shrubs. Five packages of mixed seedlings are also available, including the winter survival package which contains plants that produce fruit that will remain on the plant into the winter months, providing a valuable food source for wildlife above deep snow cover. The snow pack in a normal New Hampshire winter makes such food sources invaluable to the survival of many the State's wildlife and songbird populations when deep snow prevents the animals from foraging on the forest floor.

All of the seedlings sold at the nursery are grown from seed in the nursery seedbeds. "We collect as much of our seed as possible from local sources to ensure our seedlings are well adapted to New Hampshire climate and soils" said nursery forester Howie Lewis. "People interested in purchasing seedlings from the nursery should order them soon. We often sell out quickly of our more popular species, especially Christmas tree planting stock like Balsam and Fraser fir. We have an excellent inventory of both Balsam and Fraser this year, but they often do sell out before spring."

Seedlings were traditionally sold in quantities of 100 or more. Today, they are sold in as little as 10 per package to accommodate landowners with less planting space. Prices range from as much as $1.50 each in a package of 10 to as little as about thirty cents each for larger quantities. To request a catalog contact the Division of Forests and Lands at 271-2214. For more information visit the nursery on the web at, www.nhnursery.com or stop by the nursery facilities located on Route 3 in Boscawen. The nursery is open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Last Updated on Friday, 21 February 2014 09:38

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Third Annual Turn Up the Heat Fuel Fundraiser Raises $15,000

MEREDITH — When the reduction of Federal Funds for Fuel Assistance was announced in the fall of 2010, a small group of friends discussed how they might lend a helping to their neighbors. A fundraising committee was formed and included members from Meredith, Center Harbor, and Moultonborough. Thus, the Turn Up the Heat fuel fundraiser was created. Raising $10,000.00 was the goal set to be divided evenly among the towns of Meredith, Center Harbor, and Moultonborough.

Through the generosity of local businesses, donations from individuals, and those who purchased tickets to the event that goal became a reality. Last year, the goal was the same with even more support from the local community and beyond.

On Monday, February 10, the third annual Turn Up the Heat February Fuel Raiser was held at the Carriage House, Church Landing. Committee members included: Sandy Condojani, Jeanie Forrester, Carol Gerken, Julie Gnerre-Bourgeois, Tuffy Hamblet, Wendy Harris, Jodie Herbert, Bonnie Hunt, Terry Jutton, Diane Lane, Barbara Lauterbach, Renee Speltz and Jacki Taylor.

Major sponsors included: MVSB, NHEC, Bank of New Hampshire, Stewart's Ambulance, MRI, Mill Falls at the Lake, The Common Man, Giuseppe's Ristorante and Pizzeria, Altrusa International of Meredith and a generous private donor. Musical entertainment was donated by Geoff Cunningham.

The outcome was overwhelming. $15,000 was raised to help neighbors with fuel assistance. All three towns have shared the positive impact on neighbors who benefited from this assistance as the need is great and growing.

The committee is planning next year's event and hopes to increase the goal for our neighbors for 2015.

Last Updated on Friday, 21 February 2014 09:18

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Carbon Monoxide poisoning threat increase in the Winter (641)

LACONIA — The Fire Department wants to warn everyone about the hazards of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. Carbon monoxide is one of the leading causes of accidental poisoning deaths, and accounts for more than 50,000 emergency department visits each year in the US. During the cold weather months people will seal up their homes as tight as possible to keep in the heat. Moreover, we simply stay indoors for longer periods in the winter months. Many elderly people stay in their homes for extended periods. This can lead to a medical emergency, which can be fatal, caused by a build-up of carbon monoxide (CO) in the blood stream.

Heat equipment that burns fuel (gas stoves, furnaces, water heaters, wood stoves, coal stoves, fireplaces, pellet stoves, gas dryers, and kerosene heaters) can generate carbon monoxide. If a person stays inside their home for prolonged periods, they will breathe in and accumulate dangerous levels of this gas. If the heat equipment is defective, the build-up of CO can be rapid and fatal.

• Many newer furnaces allow for vents to be located on the outside wall with no chimney. Check the location of low level outside vents. They can easily become covered in snow and not vent dangerous gases from your home or business. This is a serious problem with seasonal homes when the furnace may be used intermittingly and allow snow to bury the vent.
• Place a CO detector in your home if you use any type of heating equipment that burns fuel such as wood, coal, or gas. A small leak in a chimney can allow CO to seep into your home. If the home is well insulated the gas will not escape.
• Do not run your car in the garage. A car engine produces enormous quantities of CO and can quickly overcome the occupants.
• Never use an outdoor grille inside your home.
• Do not use a gas oven to heat your home.
• Do not use any gasoline-powered engines (snow blowers, generators) in your home/garage, or near doors or windows.
• Do not sleep in any room with an unvented gas or kerosene heater.
• Follow instructions on any portable heating device
• A serious problem with CO poisoning is that a person affected will feel tired. Unknowingly the person or persons will go to sleep and possibly never awake. That is why CO is known as the Silent Killer. You cannot see or smell the gas. Only a CO detector will tell you that it is present. Laconia Fire Department has portable CO detectors in most of our fire trucks, as do most area fire departments. We use these devices to help locate the source of the CO.
• Do not ignore symptoms - severe headaches, dizziness, confusion, nausea or faintness. If you think you are experiencing symptoms of CO poisoning get fresh air immediately and call 911 for emergency assistance. A build up of carbon monoxide will present symptoms similar to the flu. A key clue is that your skin will have a reddish hue. This is caused by the CO displacing the oxygen in your blood stream. Your blood gets darker and is reflected in skin color.

There is almost always some small levels of CO in a home. Normal use of doors will let in fresh air. However, if you do not leave the home the gas will stay inside with you. Occasionally open your doors or windows to air out the home.

Remember that at anytime you suspect a fire or you need our help for any emergency do not hesitate to call 911. Do not call the Landlord, the furnace repair person, your friends or family – call the fire department. It is extremely important that we be notified as soon as possible of any emergency so that we can effectively deal with it. Time is probably the most critical element in an emergency response.

Last Updated on Friday, 21 February 2014 02:38

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Wolfeboro Genealogy workshop on March 4th

WOLFEBORO — The Wolfeboro Public Library, in conjunction with The Lakes Region Genealogy Interest Group, continues its series of monthly genealogical workshops on Tuesday, March 4, 2014 at 10 a.m.

Based on an Ancestry.com release entitled “Five Tips to Jumpstart Your Research,” each workshop will delve into a specific recognized and effective method of genealogical research, methods which can often uncover those long sought after and elusive family roots. In order to enhance each specific method, every workshop will feature a webinar presentation by an expert on the particular methodology being featured.

The March webinar presentation will be by Megan Smolenyak, who is recognized as one of today’s foremost genealogists. Smolenyak is the chief genealogist for Ancestry.com and the author of Who Do You Think You Are, the companion book to the TV series of the same name. Her presentation will feature what is known as reverse genealogy. This particular research technique brings the family genealogist an opportunity to locate journals, diaries, obituaries, newspaper articles, old letters and family Bibles which were thought to be lost.

In addition, for a short portion of each Tuesday program, the newly released Family Search/Family Tree will be delved into in detail with focus on the mastery of just one aspect of this comprehensive research tool. Family Search/Family Tree allows the public to access a large portion of the worldwide digitized and indexed census records, birth records, death records, burial records, marriage records, probate records, land records and military records which are held in the Family History Library. Unlike other available programs of this nature, there is no subscription fee required and no other fees charged in order to access these records.

The workshops, scheduled the first Tuesday of each month, feature methods of genealogical research both for the beginner and the seasoned genealogist and address both computer and manual techniques. The workshops are free and open to all. For further information about this event, call 569-2428 or visit www.wolfeborolibrary.org.

Last Updated on Thursday, 20 February 2014 11:52

Hits: 77

 
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