A+ A A-

CASA of N.H. Holding Information Lunch April 23

PLYMOUTH — For more than 25 years Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) has represented children at the center of abuse and neglect cases in the New Hampshire court system.

The Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) of New Hampshire is holding a brown-bag lunch Wednesday April 23, to share the story of their work on behalf of vulnerable New Hampshire Youth. The event will be held Wednesday April 23 from noon until 1:30 p.m. at the Plymouth State University Welcome Center. Plymouth State University and the Plymouth Regional Chamber of Commerce are helping to host this event. In addition to discovering more about CASA, participants will learn how they can become a CASA volunteer. The event is free and open to the public. No registration is required.

CASA of N.H. recruits, trains and supervises guardians ad litem, individuals appointed by the court to advocate for the best interests of children. A non-profit organization, CASA has worked on behalf of more than 9,000 New Hampshire children since its founding in 1989. This service is possible with the help of hundreds of trained volunteers. However, CASA can only meet the needs of 80 percent of N.H.'s abuse and neglect cases. Volunteers are needed to represent every child who has come to the attention of the courts.

CASA of N.H. is central to fulfilling society's most fundamental obligation by making sure a qualified, compassionate adult will fight for and protect a child's right to be safe, to be treated with dignity and respect, and to learn and grow in the security of a loving family. Visit www.casanh.org for more information.

Last Updated on Thursday, 17 April 2014 11:46

Hits: 90

CASA of N.H. Holding Information Lunch April 23

PLYMOUTH — For more than 25 years Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) has represented children at the center of abuse and neglect cases in the New Hampshire court system.

The Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) of New Hampshire is holding a brown-bag lunch Wednesday April 23, to share the story of their work on behalf of vulnerable New Hampshire Youth. The event will be held Wednesday April 23 from noon until 1:30 p.m. at the Plymouth State University Welcome Center. Plymouth State University and the Plymouth Regional Chamber of Commerce are helping to host this event. In addition to discovering more about CASA, participants will learn how they can become a CASA volunteer. The event is free and open to the public. No registration is required.

CASA of N.H. recruits, trains and supervises guardians ad litem, individuals appointed by the court to advocate for the best interests of children. A non-profit organization, CASA has worked on behalf of more than 9,000 New Hampshire children since its founding in 1989. This service is possible with the help of hundreds of trained volunteers. However, CASA can only meet the needs of 80 percent of N.H.'s abuse and neglect cases. Volunteers are needed to represent every child who has come to the attention of the courts.

CASA of N.H. is central to fulfilling society's most fundamental obligation by making sure a qualified, compassionate adult will fight for and protect a child's right to be safe, to be treated with dignity and respect, and to learn and grow in the security of a loving family. Visit www.casanh.org for more information.

Last Updated on Thursday, 17 April 2014 11:46

Hits: 108

Homeless Documentary To Air On Lakes Region Public Access

LACONIA — Labeled a "powerful documentary" during its premiere at the Belknap Mill last week, "The Invisible People" now will be airing on Lakes Region Public Access Television, with the first broadcasts scheduled Friday, April 18, at 10 p.m. and Saturday, April 19, at 9:05 p.m. The program also will be available on the Internet through LRPA's Video On Demand link at www.lrpa.org.

"The Invisible People" is a documentary highlighting an art and photography project in Laconia and a transitional program in Canaan where those willing to put in the effort can gain new skills that offer a step up and perhaps out of their difficulties.

Invisible to many, the homeless are facing problems of their own making and from circumstances beyond their control. Once in that situation, it is difficult to recover. However, these two programs provide a chance for them to gain a sense of self-worth, discovering hidden talents and ways to make a fresh start.

River Crew Art in Laconia provides art supplies and cameras to the homeless, guiding them in sharpening their skills and developing a sense of accomplishment. Meeting on Monday mornings, the program provides a supportive environment for experimentation, followed by a hot meal for the participants. Each year, River Crew Art holds an art and photography show where their creations are put on exhibition, to critical acclaim.

A Sacred Place in Canaan offers a safe location for those willing to work with farm animals and gain agricultural skills. More importantly, those camping there will have a permanent address to use in applying for work and benefits. The hours may be long, but the work is not difficult and it produces new skills that participants can rely on when they are ready to move on. The program has given a boost to those who are sincere about trying to turn their lives around.
"The Invisible People" is part of the Liberty Independent Media Project's ongoing mission of showcasing the arts, history, and culture with a special focus on those overcoming adversity. For more information on the Liberty Project, see www.libertymedianh.org.

Last Updated on Thursday, 17 April 2014 11:44

Hits: 60

Homeless Documentary To Air On Lakes Region Public Access

LACONIA — Labeled a "powerful documentary" during its premiere at the Belknap Mill last week, "The Invisible People" now will be airing on Lakes Region Public Access Television, with the first broadcasts scheduled Friday, April 18, at 10 p.m. and Saturday, April 19, at 9:05 p.m. The program also will be available on the Internet through LRPA's Video On Demand link at www.lrpa.org.

"The Invisible People" is a documentary highlighting an art and photography project in Laconia and a transitional program in Canaan where those willing to put in the effort can gain new skills that offer a step up and perhaps out of their difficulties.

Invisible to many, the homeless are facing problems of their own making and from circumstances beyond their control. Once in that situation, it is difficult to recover. However, these two programs provide a chance for them to gain a sense of self-worth, discovering hidden talents and ways to make a fresh start.

River Crew Art in Laconia provides art supplies and cameras to the homeless, guiding them in sharpening their skills and developing a sense of accomplishment. Meeting on Monday mornings, the program provides a supportive environment for experimentation, followed by a hot meal for the participants. Each year, River Crew Art holds an art and photography show where their creations are put on exhibition, to critical acclaim.

A Sacred Place in Canaan offers a safe location for those willing to work with farm animals and gain agricultural skills. More importantly, those camping there will have a permanent address to use in applying for work and benefits. The hours may be long, but the work is not difficult and it produces new skills that participants can rely on when they are ready to move on. The program has given a boost to those who are sincere about trying to turn their lives around.
"The Invisible People" is part of the Liberty Independent Media Project's ongoing mission of showcasing the arts, history, and culture with a special focus on those overcoming adversity. For more information on the Liberty Project, see www.libertymedianh.org.

Last Updated on Thursday, 17 April 2014 11:44

Hits: 38

 
The Laconia Daily Sun - All Rights Reserved
Privacy Policy
Powered by BENN a division of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Login or Register

LOG IN