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Squam Collaborative Focuses on Invasive Species in the Squam Watershed

HOLDERNESS — In 2012 several Squam Watershed organizations formed a working group to address terrestrial invasive species through both education and removal efforts.

The Lakes Region Conservation Trust, Rockywold Deephaven Camps, the Squam Lakes Association (SLA), the Squam Lakes Natural Science Center, and the Squam Lakes Conservation Society (SLCS) have joined to form the Squam Watershed Invasive Species Collaborative (SWISC). By combining expertise, volunteer recruitment and work days, the members of this collaborative will be able to better manage properties for invasive species such as Japanese knotweed, bush honeysuckle, Japanese barberry, oriental bittersweet and multiflora rose.

May is a great time to begin to manage terrestrial invasive species. The soil is soft, making for easy removal, and plants have not yet produced flowers or fruit. This year, there is a watershed-wide focus on invasive species. First, Holderness Recreation welcomes Doug Cygan, Invasive Species Coordinator for the NH Department of Agriculture. On Tuesday, May 6 Cygan will discuss Invasive Upland Plant Species of New Hampshire. To learn more or to register contact Holderness Recreation (968-3700 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ).

This May SWISC is pleased to offer two work days. The first, held on Saturday, May 10 from 9 am-12pm, will focus on the West Rattlesnake Trailhead on Route 113 in Holderness. This property, owned by the Squam Lakes Association, has a small infestation of oriental bittersweet.

"The Rattlesnake parking lot is a great spot for invasive removal," says SLA Director of Conservation Rebecca Hanson. "It's a small infestation, and we should be able to remove most of the bittersweet. The high usage of this area is also a great opportunity for visitor education."

On Friday, May 16 from 9am-12pm, SWISC will host one more work day, at the Squam Lakes Conservation Society's Mill Brook property on Route 3 in Holderness. The Collaborative held a work day in this area between White Oak Pond and Squam's Piper Cove, last May.

"This year, we return to assess the work we did in 2013," says SLCS Stewardship Coordinator Joan Turley. "It will be exciting to both observe our progress and continue to remove invasive species from the Mill Brook property."

To learn more or to register, contact either the Squam Lakes Association's website (603-968-7336; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) or the Squam Lakes Conservation Society's website (603-968-7900; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ).

 
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